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      Cancer statistics for African American/Black People 2022

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="d5856991e102">African American/Black individuals have a disproportionate cancer burden, including the highest mortality and the lowest survival of any racial/ethnic group for most cancers. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths for Black people in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence (herein through 2018), mortality (through 2019), survival, screening, and risk factors using population-based data from the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2022, there will be approximately 224,080 new cancer cases and 73,680 cancer deaths among Black people in the United States. During the most recent 5-year period, Black men had a 6% higher incidence rate but 19% higher mortality than White men overall, including an approximately 2-fold higher risk of death from myeloma, stomach cancer, and prostate cancer. The overall cancer mortality disparity is narrowing between Black and White men because of a steeper drop in Black men for lung and prostate cancers. However, the decline in prostate cancer mortality in Black men slowed from 5% annually during 2010 through 2014 to 1.3% during 2015 through 2019, likely reflecting the 5% annual increase in advanced-stage diagnoses since 2012. Black women have an 8% lower incidence rate than White women but a 12% higher mortality; further, mortality rates are 2-fold higher for endometrial cancer and 41% higher for breast cancer despite similar or lower incidence rates. The wide breast cancer disparity reflects both later stage diagnosis (57% localized stage vs 67% in White women) and lower 5-year survival overall (82% vs 92%, respectively) and for every stage of disease (eg, 20% vs 30%, respectively, for distant stage). Breast cancer surpassed lung cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among Black women in 2019. Targeted interventions are needed to reduce stark cancer inequalities in the Black community. </p>

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          Journal
          CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
          CA A Cancer J Clinicians
          Wiley
          0007-9235
          1542-4863
          February 10 2022
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Surveillance and Health Equity Science American Cancer Society Atlanta Georgia USA
          [2 ]Department of Health Behavior and Policy Virginia Commonwealth University Richmond Virginia USA
          Article
          10.3322/caac.21718
          35143040
          f153cfa5-18ac-4aa4-9995-361a4c18cea1
          © 2022

          http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

          http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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