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      Japanese Interest in “Hotaru” (Fireflies) and “Kabuto-Mushi” (Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles) Corresponds with Seasonality in Visible Abundance

      research-article
      Insects
      MDPI
      fireflies, Japanese rhinoceros beetles, seasonal interest, the Japanese, popularity, Google Trends, cultural entomology

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          Abstract

          Seasonal changes in the popularity of fireflies [usually Genji-fireflies ( Luciola cruciata Motschulsky) in Japan] and Japanese rhinoceros beetles [ Allomyrina dichotoma (Linne)] were investigated to examine whether contemporary Japanese are interested in visible emergence of these insects as seasonal events. The popularity of fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles was assessed by the Google search volume of their Japanese names, “Hotaru” and “Kabuto-mushi” in Japanese Katakana script using Google Trends. The search volume index for fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles was distributed across seasons with a clear peak in only particular times of each year from 2004 to 2011. In addition, the seasonal peak of popularity for fireflies occurred at the beginning of June, whereas that for Japanese rhinoceros beetles occurred from the middle of July to the beginning of August. Thus seasonal peak of each species coincided with the peak period of the emergence of each adult stage. These findings indicated that the Japanese are interested in these insects primarily during the time when the two species are most visibly abundant. Although untested, this could suggest that fireflies and Japanese rhinoceros beetles are perceived by the general public as indicators or symbols of summer in Japan.

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          Most cited references29

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          Predicting consumer behavior with Web search.

          Recent work has demonstrated that Web search volume can "predict the present," meaning that it can be used to accurately track outcomes such as unemployment levels, auto and home sales, and disease prevalence in near real time. Here we show that what consumers are searching for online can also predict their collective future behavior days or even weeks in advance. Specifically we use search query volume to forecast the opening weekend box-office revenue for feature films, first-month sales of video games, and the rank of songs on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, finding in all cases that search counts are highly predictive of future outcomes. We also find that search counts generally boost the performance of baseline models fit on other publicly available data, where the boost varies from modest to dramatic, depending on the application in question. Finally, we reexamine previous work on tracking flu trends and show that, perhaps surprisingly, the utility of search data relative to a simple autoregressive model is modest. We conclude that in the absence of other data sources, or where small improvements in predictive performance are material, search queries provide a useful guide to the near future.
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            Cultural Entomology

            C L Hogue (1987)
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              A Strategic Perspective on Search Engines: Thought Candies for Practitioners and Researchers

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Insects
                Insects
                insects
                Insects
                MDPI
                2075-4450
                10 April 2012
                June 2012
                : 3
                : 2
                : 424-431
                Affiliations
                3-13-29, Takejima, Nishiyodogawa-ku, Osaka, 555-0011, Japan; E-Mail: athemus99@ 123456yahoo.co.jp ; Tel.: +81-6-6473-4128; Fax: +81-6-6473-4128
                Article
                insects-03-00424
                10.3390/insects3020424
                4553602
                f18302a2-b6fa-49d3-95c6-2682b6a2a027
                © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

                This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

                History
                : 17 March 2012
                : 31 March 2012
                : 02 April 2012
                Categories
                Article

                fireflies,japanese rhinoceros beetles,seasonal interest,the japanese,popularity,google trends,cultural entomology

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