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      Hybridization of Oxalis corniculata and O. dillenii in their non-native range

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          Abstract

          Many species have been introduced beyond their native ranges and many have become global weeds. Human mediated dispersal has removed the geographic isolation of these species, reversing millions of years of independent evolution. Examples are the Oxalis species in section Corniculatae where several species have become invasive. Here we characterize and formally describe a hybrid between O. dillenii and O. corniculata , which occurs spontaneously in Belgium and Japan. Oxalis corniculata is probably native to Japan, but both species are alien to Belgium and O. dillenii is native to North America. We formally name this hybrid as Oxalis × vanaelstii . Although this hybrid is sterile, it is nevertheless vigorous and perennial. Both parent species grow as weeds in gardens; therefore, it is likely to be more common than currently appreciated in countries where these species co-occur.

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          Most cited references 27

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          Universal primers for amplification of three non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA.

          Six primers for the amplification of three non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been designed. In order to find out whether these primers were universal, we used them in an attempt to amplify DNA from various plant species. The primers worked for most species tested including algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. The fact that they amplify chloroplast DNA non-coding regions over a wide taxonomic range means that these primers may be used to study the population biology (in supplying markers) and evolution (inter- and probably intraspecific phylogenies) of plants.
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            MAFFT: a novel method for rapid multiple sequence alignment based on fast Fourier transform.

             K Katoh (2002)
            A multiple sequence alignment program, MAFFT, has been developed. The CPU time is drastically reduced as compared with existing methods. MAFFT includes two novel techniques. (i) Homo logous regions are rapidly identified by the fast Fourier transform (FFT), in which an amino acid sequence is converted to a sequence composed of volume and polarity values of each amino acid residue. (ii) We propose a simplified scoring system that performs well for reducing CPU time and increasing the accuracy of alignments even for sequences having large insertions or extensions as well as distantly related sequences of similar length. Two different heuristics, the progressive method (FFT-NS-2) and the iterative refinement method (FFT-NS-i), are implemented in MAFFT. The performances of FFT-NS-2 and FFT-NS-i were compared with other methods by computer simulations and benchmark tests; the CPU time of FFT-NS-2 is drastically reduced as compared with CLUSTALW with comparable accuracy. FFT-NS-i is over 100 times faster than T-COFFEE, when the number of input sequences exceeds 60, without sacrificing the accuracy.
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              AMPLIFICATION AND DIRECT SEQUENCING OF FUNGAL RIBOSOMAL RNA GENES FOR PHYLOGENETICS

               T.J White,  T. Bruns,  S. Lee (1990)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PhytoKeys
                PhytoKeys
                3
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F7FCE910-8E78-573F-9C77-7788555F8AAD
                PhytoKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2011
                1314-2003
                2021
                18 May 2021
                : 178
                : 17-30
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Meise Botanic Garden, Nieuwelaan 38, 1860, Meise, Belgium Meise Botanic Garden Meise Belgium
                [2 ] Biology Department, KU Leuven, Belgium KU Leuven Leuven Belgium
                [3 ] ILVO, Plant Sciences Unit, Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Caritasstraat 39, 9090, Melle, Belgium Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Melle Belgium
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Quentin Groom ( quentin.groom@ 123456plantentuinmeise.be )

                Academic editor: Hugo de Boer

                Article
                61031
                10.3897/phytokeys.178.61031
                8149379
                34054321
                Quentin Groom, Sofie Meeus, Steven B. Janssens, Leen Leus, Ivan Hoste

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Oxalidaceae
                Biogeography
                Biological Invasions
                Taxonomy
                Belgium

                Plant science & Botany

                stomata, dna content, oxalis × vanaelstii, pollen

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