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      Digitising and Re-examining Vere Gordon Childe’s ‘Dawn of European Civilization’: a celebration of the UCL Institute of Archaeology’s 80th Anniversary

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      Archaeology International

      Ubiquity Press

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          Abstract

          This article presents a detailed examination of Gordon Childe’s The Dawn of European Civilization, one of the best known books in European Archaeology. An overview of the book, its scope and influence is provided, as well as an analysis of its complex theoretical structures and philosophical context. Detailed sequential analysis of all six editions reveals how the original was repeatedly reinvented by Childe over a thirty year period in response to advances in European archaeology, his own theoretical interests and external political factors. The importance of the book for the history of 20 th century archaeology and its role as an ‘ancestral text’ are assessed.

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          Strontium Isotopes and Prehistoric Human Migration: The Bell Beaker Period in Central Europe

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            Maritime route of colonization of Europe.

            The Neolithic populations, which colonized Europe approximately 9,000 y ago, presumably migrated from Near East to Anatolia and from there to Central Europe through Thrace and the Balkans. An alternative route would have been island hopping across the Southern European coast. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed genome-wide DNA polymorphisms on populations bordering the Mediterranean coast and from Anatolia and mainland Europe. We observe a striking structure correlating genes with geography around the Mediterranean Sea with characteristic east to west clines of gene flow. Using population network analysis, we also find that the gene flow from Anatolia to Europe was through Dodecanese, Crete, and the Southern European coast, compatible with the hypothesis that a maritime coastal route was mainly used for the migration of Neolithic farmers to Europe.
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              V. GORDON CHILDE: ARCHAEOLOGY AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2048-4194
                Archaeology International
                Ubiquity Press
                2048-4194
                14 December 2017
                2017
                : 20
                : 91-105
                Affiliations
                [1 ]UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, London WC1H 0PY, UK
                Article
                10.5334/ai-357
                Copyright: © 2017 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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                Research article

                Archaeology, Cultural studies

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