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      Comparing football bettors' response to social media marketing differing in bet complexity and account type – An experimental study

      , 1 , , 2

      Journal of Behavioral Addictions

      Akadémiai Kiadó

      sports betting, marketing, social media

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          Abstract

          Background and aims

          The current study aimed to assess how sports bettors respond to advertised bets on social media and whether this differs dependent upon bet complexity and social media account type.

          Methods

          Employing a 3 × 2 repeated measures design, 145 regular football bettors were recruited to take part in an online study requiring them to rate bets advertised upon social media, providing indications of their likelihood to bet, confidence in the bet and how much they would stake on the bet. Advertised bets differed in terms of complexity (low, medium and high) and each bet was presented separately on both an operator account and an affiliate account.

          Results

          Data analysis highlighted a significant interaction between bet complexity and account type, with bettors rating themselves as being more likely to bet and more confident in bets which were presented on an affiliate account for medium complexity bets but not for low or high complexity bets.

          Discussion and conclusions

          This study provides initial evidence that affiliate marketing of sports betting increases bettor's confidence in certain types of bets. This heightens previously addressed concerns around affiliate marketing, given that affiliates are financially incentivised to attract custom toward gambling operators. Future research should explore risk factors for increased uptake of affiliate marketing, and the impact on gambling behaviour.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          2006
          Journal of Behavioral Addictions
          JBA
          Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
          2062-5871
          2063-5303
          26 September 2020
          Affiliations
          [1 ] NB155, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University , Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK
          [2 ] Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University , Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK
          Author notes
          [* ]Corresponding author. E-mail: scott2.houghton@ 123456northumbria.ac.uk
          Article
          10.1556/2006.2020.00056
          © 2020 The Author(s)

          Open Access. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

          Page count
          Figures: 1, Tables: 3, Equations: 0, References: 29, Pages: 08
          Product
          Self URI (journal page): https://akademiai.com/loi/2006
          Funding
          Funded by: GambleAware
          Categories
          Full-Length Report

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