Blog
About

10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Mobile gaming and problematic smartphone use: A comparative study between Belgium and Finland

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background and aims

          Gaming applications have become one of the main entertainment features on smartphones, and this could be potentially problematic in terms of dangerous, prohibited, and dependent use among a minority of individuals. A cross-national study was conducted in Belgium and Finland. The aim was to examine the relationship between gaming on smartphones and self-perceived problematic smartphone use via an online survey to ascertain potential predictors.

          Methods

          The Short Version of the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPUQ-SV) was administered to a sample comprising 899 participants (30% male; age range: 18–67 years).

          Results

          Good validity and adequate reliability were confirmed regarding the PMPUQ-SV, especially the dependence subscale, but low prevalence rates were reported in both countries using the scale. Regression analysis showed that downloading, using Facebook, and being stressed contributed to problematic smartphone use. Anxiety emerged as predictor for dependence. Mobile games were used by one-third of the respective populations, but their use did not predict problematic smartphone use. Very few cross-cultural differences were found in relation to gaming through smartphones.

          Conclusion

          Findings suggest mobile gaming does not appear to be problematic in Belgium and Finland.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 68

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Uses and abuses of coefficient alpha.

           Neal Schmitt (1996)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Development and Validation of a Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS)

            Objective The aim of this study was to develop a self-diagnostic scale that could distinguish smartphone addicts based on the Korean self-diagnostic program for Internet addiction (K-scale) and the smartphone's own features. In addition, the reliability and validity of the smartphone addiction scale (SAS) was demonstrated. Methods A total of 197 participants were selected from Nov. 2011 to Jan. 2012 to accomplish a set of questionnaires, including SAS, K-scale, modified Kimberly Young Internet addiction test (Y-scale), visual analogue scale (VAS), and substance dependence and abuse diagnosis of DSM-IV. There were 64 males and 133 females, with ages ranging from 18 to 53 years (M = 26.06; SD = 5.96). Factor analysis, internal-consistency test, t-test, ANOVA, and correlation analysis were conducted to verify the reliability and validity of SAS. Results Based on the factor analysis results, the subscale “disturbance of reality testing” was removed, and six factors were left. The internal consistency and concurrent validity of SAS were verified (Cronbach's alpha = 0.967). SAS and its subscales were significantly correlated with K-scale and Y-scale. The VAS of each factor also showed a significant correlation with each subscale. In addition, differences were found in the job (p<0.05), education (p<0.05), and self-reported smartphone addiction scores (p<0.001) in SAS. Conclusions This study developed the first scale of the smartphone addiction aspect of the diagnostic manual. This scale was proven to be relatively reliable and valid.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Mobile phone use and stress, sleep disturbances, and symptoms of depression among young adults - a prospective cohort study

              Background Because of the quick development and widespread use of mobile phones, and their vast effect on communication and interactions, it is important to study possible negative health effects of mobile phone exposure. The overall aim of this study was to investigate whether there are associations between psychosocial aspects of mobile phone use and mental health symptoms in a prospective cohort of young adults. Methods The study group consisted of young adults 20-24 years old (n = 4156), who responded to a questionnaire at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Mobile phone exposure variables included frequency of use, but also more qualitative variables: demands on availability, perceived stressfulness of accessibility, being awakened at night by the mobile phone, and personal overuse of the mobile phone. Mental health outcomes included current stress, sleep disorders, and symptoms of depression. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were calculated for cross-sectional and prospective associations between exposure variables and mental health outcomes for men and women separately. Results There were cross-sectional associations between high compared to low mobile phone use and stress, sleep disturbances, and symptoms of depression for the men and women. When excluding respondents reporting mental health symptoms at baseline, high mobile phone use was associated with sleep disturbances and symptoms of depression for the men and symptoms of depression for the women at 1-year follow-up. All qualitative variables had cross-sectional associations with mental health outcomes. In prospective analysis, overuse was associated with stress and sleep disturbances for women, and high accessibility stress was associated with stress, sleep disturbances, and symptoms of depression for both men and women. Conclusions High frequency of mobile phone use at baseline was a risk factor for mental health outcomes at 1-year follow-up among the young adults. The risk for reporting mental health symptoms at follow-up was greatest among those who had perceived accessibility via mobile phones to be stressful. Public health prevention strategies focusing on attitudes could include information and advice, helping young adults to set limits for their own and others' accessibility.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jba
                JBA
                Journal of Behavioral Addictions
                J Behav Addict
                Akadémiai Kiadó (Budapest )
                2062-5871
                2063-5303
                08 January 2018
                March 2018
                : 7
                : 1
                : 88-99
                Affiliations
                [ 1 ]International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Department, Nottingham Trent University , Nottingham, UK
                [ 2 ]Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology, Institut de recherche en sciences psychologiques, Université catholique de Louvain , Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium
                [ 3 ]Department of Social Services and Rehabilitation, Oulu University of Applied Sciences , Oulu, Finland
                [ 4 ]Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu , Oulu, Finland
                [ 5 ]Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, Oulu University Hospital , Oulu, Finland
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: Olatz Lopez-Fernandez, PhD; Department of Psychology, Nottingham Trent University, 50 Shakespeare Street, Nottingham NG1 4FQ, UK; Laboratory for Experimental Psychopathology, Université catholique de Louvain, 10 Place du Cardinal Mercier, Louvain-La-Neuve 1348, Belgium; Phone: +44 115 848 2977; E-mails: olatz.lopez-fernandez@ 123456ntu.ac.uk ; lopez.olatz@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                10.1556/2006.6.2017.080
                6035026
                29313732
                © 2018 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 3, Equations: 0, References: 89, Pages: 12
                Funding
                Funding sources: This work was supported by the European Commission (“Tech Use Disorders;” FP7-PEOPLE-805-2013-IEF-627999) through a grant awarded to OL-F.
                Categories
                FULL-LENGTH REPORT

                Comments

                Comment on this article