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      Impact of a Long Asylum Procedure on the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Iraqi Asylum Seekers in The Netherlands :

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          Abstract

          Clinically, a long asylum procedure seems to be associated with psychiatric disorders. However, data on this issue are lacking. In a national community-based study, using random sampling, we compared two groups of Iraqi asylum seekers, who had resided less than 6 months (N = 143) and more than 2 years (N= 151), respectively, in The Netherlands. Respondents were interviewed with fully structured, culturally validated, translated questionnaires. Psychiatric (DSM-IV) disorders were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 and evaluated in relation with premigration and postmigration adverse life events. Overall prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 42% in the first group and 66.2% in the second. The prevalence rates of anxiety, depressive, and somatoform disorders were significantly higher in the second group. Posttraumatic stress disorder was high in both groups but did not differ (p > .05). On logistic regression of all relevant risk factors, a long asylum procedure showed an odds ratio of 2.16 (confidence interval = 1.15-4.08) for psychopathology. The conclusion is that, indeed, the duration of the asylum procedure is an important risk factor for psychiatric problems. Both politicians and mental health workers should take note of this finding.

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          Anxiety, depression and PTSD in asylum-seekers: assocations with pre-migration trauma and post-migration stressors.

          Research into the mental health of refugees has burgeoned in recent times, but there is a dearth of studies focusing specifically on the factors associated with psychiatric distress in asylum-seekers who have not been accorded residency status. Forty consecutive asylum-seekers attending a community resource centre in Sydney, Australia, were interviewed using structured instruments and questionnaires. Anxiety scores were associated with female gender, poverty, and conflict with immigration officials, while loneliness and boredom were linked with both anxiety and depression. Thirty subjects (79%) had experienced a traumatic event such as witnessing killings, being assaulted, or suffering torture and captivity, and 14 subjects (37%) met full criteria for PTSD. A diagnosis of PTSD was associated with greater exposure to pre-migration trauma, delays in processing refugee applications, difficulties in dealing with immigration officials, obstacles to employment, racial discrimination, and loneliness and boredom. Although based on correlational data derived from'a convenient' sample, our findings raise the possibility that current procedures for dealing with asylum-seekers may contribute to high levels of stress and psychiatric symptoms in those who have been previously traumatised.
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            Preparing Instruments for Transcultural Research: Use of the Translation Monitoring Form with Nepali-Speaking Bhutanese Refugees

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              Common mental disorders in postconflict settings.

              Research into postconflict psychiatric sequelae in low-income countries has been focused largely on symptoms rather than on full psychiatric diagnostic assessment. We assessed 3048 respondents from postconflict communities in Algeria, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Palestine with the aim of establishing the prevalence of mood disorder, somatoform disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other anxiety disorders. PTSD and other anxiety disorders were the most frequent problems. In three countries, PTSD was the most likely disorder in individuals exposed to violence associated with armed conflict, but such violence was a common risk factor for various disorders and comorbidity combinations in different settings. In three countries, anxiety disorder was reported most in people who had not been exposed to such violence. Experience of violence associated with armed conflict was associated with higher rates of disorder that ranged from a risk ratio of 2.10 (95% CI 1.38-2.85) for anxiety in Algeria to 10.03 (5.26-16.65) for PTSD in Palestine. Postconflict mental health programmes should address a range of common disorders beyond PTSD.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
                The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                0022-3018
                2004
                December 2004
                : 192
                : 12
                : 843-851
                Article
                10.1097/01.nmd.0000146739.26187.15
                15583506
                f27f96c4-6d94-4c07-a022-db93b6336d43
                © 2004
                History

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