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      Mechanisms of disease: psychomotor retardation and high T3 levels caused by mutations in monocarboxylate transporter 8.

      Nature clinical practice. Endocrinology & metabolism

      Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Carrier Proteins, physiology, Genetic Testing, Humans, Kidney, metabolism, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Molecular Sequence Data, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters, analysis, genetics, Mutation, Neurons, Psychomotor Disorders, diagnosis, Thyroid Gland, Triiodothyronine

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          Abstract

          The actions and the metabolism of thyroid hormone are intracellular events that require the transport of iodothyronines across the plasma membrane. It is increasingly clear that this process does not occur by simple diffusion, but is facilitated by transport proteins. Only recently have iodothyronine transporters been identified at the molecular level, of which organic anion transporting polypeptide 1C1 and monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) deserve special mention, because of their high activity and specificity for iodothyronines. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1C1 is almost exclusively expressed in brain capillaries, and may be crucial for the transport of the prohormone T4 across the blood-brain barrier. MCT8 is also expressed in the brain--in particular, in neurons--but also in other tissues. MCT8 seems to be especially important for the uptake of active hormone T3 into neurons, which is essential for optimal brain development. T3 is produced from T4 by type 2 deiodinase in neighboring astrocytes. Neurons express type 3 deiodinase, the enzyme that terminates T3 activity. The SLC16A2 (formerly MCT8) gene is located on chromosome Xq13.2 and has recently been associated with a syndrome combining severe, X-linked, psychomotor retardation and high serum T3 levels. In over 20 families, where affected males have developed this syndrome, several mutations in MCT8 have been identified. The disease mechanism is thought to involve a defect in the neuronal entry of T3 and, therefore, in the action and metabolism of T3 in these cells. This defect results in impaired neurological development and a decrease in T3 clearance.

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          Most cited references 49

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          Physiological and molecular basis of thyroid hormone action.

           Paul Yen (2001)
          Thyroid hormones (THs) play critical roles in the differentiation, growth, metabolism, and physiological function of virtually all tissues. TH binds to receptors that are ligand-regulatable transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Tremendous progress has been made recently in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie TH action. In this review, we present the major advances in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of TH action and their implications for TH action in specific tissues, resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome, and genetically engineered mouse models.
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            Biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, and physiological roles of the iodothyronine selenodeiodinases.

            The goal of this review is to place the exciting advances that have occurred in our understanding of the molecular biology of the types 1, 2, and 3 (D1, D2, and D3, respectively) iodothyronine deiodinases into a biochemical and physiological context. We review new data regarding the mechanism of selenoprotein synthesis, the molecular and cellular biological properties of the individual deiodinases, including gene structure, mRNA and protein characteristics, tissue distribution, subcellular localization and topology, enzymatic properties, structure-activity relationships, and regulation of synthesis, inactivation, and degradation. These provide the background for a discussion of their role in thyroid physiology in humans and other vertebrates, including evidence that D2 plays a significant role in human plasma T(3) production. We discuss the pathological role of D3 overexpression causing "consumptive hypothyroidism" as well as our current understanding of the pathophysiology of iodothyronine deiodination during illness and amiodarone therapy. Finally, we review the new insights from analysis of mice with targeted disruption of the Dio2 gene and overexpression of D2 in the myocardium.
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              The SLC16 gene family-from monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) to aromatic amino acid transporters and beyond.

              The monocarboxylate cotransporter (MCT) family now comprises 14 members, of which only the first four (MCT1-MCT4) have been demonstrated experimentally to catalyse the proton-linked transport of metabolically important monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and ketone bodies. SLC16A10 (T-type amino-acid transporter-1, TAT1) is an aromatic amino acid transporter whilst the other members await characterization. MCTs have 12 transmembrane domains (TMDs) with intracellular N- and C-termini and a large intracellular loop between TMDs 6 and 7. MCT1 and MCT4 require a monotopic ancillary protein, CD147, for expression of functional protein at the plasma membrane. Lactic acid transport across the plasma membrane is fundamental for the metabolism of and pH regulation of all cells, removing lactic acid produced by glycolysis and allowing uptake by those cells utilizing it for gluconeogenesis (liver and kidney) or as a respiratory fuel (heart and red muscle). The properties of the different MCT isoforms and their tissue distribution and regulation reflect these roles.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                16957765
                10.1038/ncpendmet0262

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