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      Macrophage plasticity and interaction with lymphocyte subsets: cancer as a paradigm.

      Nature immunology

      immunology, Neoplasms, Monocytes, metabolism, Macrophages, Macrophage Activation, Lymphocyte Subsets, Inflammation, Humans, biosynthesis, Cytokines, Animals

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          Abstract

          Plasticity is a hallmark of cells of the myelomonocytic lineage. In response to innate recognition or signals from lymphocyte subsets, mononuclear phagocytes undergo adaptive responses. Shaping of monocyte-macrophage function is an essential component of resistance to pathogens, tissue damage and repair. The orchestration of myelomonocytic cell function is a key element that links inflammation and cancer and provides a paradigm for macrophage plasticity and function. A better understanding of the molecular basis of myelomonocytic cell plasticity will open new vistas in immunopathology and therapeutic intervention.

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          Most cited references 105

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          Cancer-related inflammation.

          The mediators and cellular effectors of inflammation are important constituents of the local environment of tumours. In some types of cancer, inflammatory conditions are present before a malignant change occurs. Conversely, in other types of cancer, an oncogenic change induces an inflammatory microenvironment that promotes the development of tumours. Regardless of its origin, 'smouldering' inflammation in the tumour microenvironment has many tumour-promoting effects. It aids in the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promotes angiogenesis and metastasis, subverts adaptive immune responses, and alters responses to hormones and chemotherapeutic agents. The molecular pathways of this cancer-related inflammation are now being unravelled, resulting in the identification of new target molecules that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.
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            Exploring the full spectrum of macrophage activation.

            Macrophages display remarkable plasticity and can change their physiology in response to environmental cues. These changes can give rise to different populations of cells with distinct functions. In this Review we suggest a new grouping of macrophage populations based on three different homeostatic activities - host defence, wound healing and immune regulation. We propose that similarly to primary colours, these three basic macrophage populations can blend into various other 'shades' of activation. We characterize each population and provide examples of macrophages from specific disease states that have the characteristics of one or more of these populations.
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              Type, density, and location of immune cells within human colorectal tumors predict clinical outcome.

              The role of the adaptive immune response in controlling the growth and recurrence of human tumors has been controversial. We characterized the tumor-infiltrating immune cells in large cohorts of human colorectal cancers by gene expression profiling and in situ immunohistochemical staining. Collectively, the immunological data (the type, density, and location of immune cells within the tumor samples) were found to be a better predictor of patient survival than the histopathological methods currently used to stage colorectal cancer. The results were validated in two additional patient populations. These data support the hypothesis that the adaptive immune response influences the behavior of human tumors. In situ analysis of tumor-infiltrating immune cells may therefore be a valuable prognostic tool in the treatment of colorectal cancer and possibly other malignancies.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                20856220
                10.1038/ni.1937

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