Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Editorial: The Role of the Distinctions between Identification/Production and Perceptual/Conceptual Processes in Implicit Memory: Findings from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience and Neuropsychology

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 9

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Convergent behavioral and neuropsychological evidence for a distinction between identification and production forms of repetition priming.

      Four experiments examined a distinction between kinds of repetition priming which involve either the identification of the form or meaning of a stimulus or the production of a response on the basis of a cue. Patients with Alzheimer's disease had intact priming on picture-naming and category-exemplar identification tasks and impaired priming on word-stem completion and category-exemplar production tasks. Division of study-phase attention in healthy participants reduced priming on word-stem completion and category-exemplar production tasks but not on picture-naming and category-exemplar identification tasks. The parallel dissociations in normal and abnormal memory cannot be explained by implicit-explicit or perceptual-conceptual distinctions but are explained by an identification-production distinction. There may be separable cognitive and neural bases for implicit modulation of identification and production forms of knowledge.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Evidence for multiple mechanisms of conceptual priming on implicit memory tests.

        The authors examined effects of encoding manipulations on 4 conceptual-implicit memory tasks: word-cued association, category-cued association, category verification, and abstract/concrete classification. Study-phase conceptual elaboration enhanced priming for word-cued association with weakly associated words (Experiment 3), and for category-cued association with high- and low-dominance exemplars (Experiments 4 and 5), but did not enhance priming for word-cued association with strongly associated words (Experiments 1 and 2), for category verification with high- and low-dominance exemplars (Experiment 5), or for abstract/concrete classification (Experiment 7). Forms of priming that were unaffected by conceptual elaboration were not mediated by perceptual processes because they were unaffected by study-test modality changes (Experiments 6 and 8). The dissociative effects of conceptual elaboration on conceptual-implicit tasks suggest that at least 2 dissociable mechanisms mediate conceptual priming.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Impaired production priming and intact identification priming in Alzheimer's disease.

          This study examined the distinction between identification and production processes in repetition priming for 16 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 16 healthy old control participants (NC). Words were read in three study phases. In three test phases, participants (1) reread studied words, along with unstudied words, in a word-naming task (identification priming); (2) completed 3-letter stems of studied and unstudied words into words in a word-stem completion task (production priming); and (3) answered yes or no to having read studied and unstudied words in a recognition task (explicit memory). Explicit memory and word-stem completion priming were impaired in the AD group compared to the NC group. After correcting for baseline slowing, word-naming priming magnitude did not differ between the groups. The results suggest that the distinction between production and identification processes has promise for explaining the pattern of preservation and failure of repetition priming in AD.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1Department of Psychology, Whitman College Walla Walla, WA, United States
            2Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome Rome, Italy
            Author notes

            Edited and reviewed by: Bernhard Hommel, Leiden University, Netherlands

            *Correspondence: Matthew W. Prull prullmw@ 123456whitman.edu

            This article was submitted to Cognition, a section of the journal Frontiers in Psychology

            Contributors
            Journal
            Front Psychol
            Front Psychol
            Front. Psychol.
            Frontiers in Psychology
            Frontiers Media S.A.
            1664-1078
            30 June 2017
            2017
            : 8
            5492041
            10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01129
            Copyright © 2017 Prull and Spataro.

            This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

            Counts
            Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 9, Pages: 3, Words: 1591
            Categories
            Psychology
            Editorial

            Comments

            Comment on this article