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      Data from monogenean and endohelminth communities in twospot livebearer Pseudoxiphophorus bimaculatus (Teleostei: Poeciliidae) populations in a neotropical river

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          Abstract

          The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Competition from sea to mountain: interactions and aggregation in low diversity monogenean and endohelminth communities in twospot livebearer Pseudoxiphophorus bimaculatus (Teleostei: Poeciliidae) populations in a neotropical river.” accepted for publication in Ecology and Evolution. The data describes the communities of helminth parasites in 11 populations of a small poeciliid freshwater fish Pseudoxiphophorus bimaculatus (Heckel, 1848) sampled along the La Antigua river basin in Veracruz, Mexico. We examined 19 P bimaculatus from one locality, 21 from another locality, and 20 from each of the other nine locations sampled in June 2016. A total of 220 individual fish were examined, and in this paper we provide the data for 18 helminth parasite taxa recorded from them. The material in this Data paper comprised the raw data on the abundance, i.e. the number of helminth individuals of each of 18 taxa found in each one individual of P. bimaculatus from each of 11 localities. The data set is contained in a single text-table including one matrix containing each of the 220 host P. bimaculatus examined from 11 localities (lines). Measures for each host P. bimaculatus include total length, standard length, maximum deep and sex, documented for everyone fish examined, plus data of the number of individual helminth of each taxa collected by each examined fish are placed in the columns. These data might be used to examine spatial distribution of helminth parasite taxa. These data might be reused to examine the spatial variation in community structure of helminth parasites of freshwater fish. This kind of data could be used to provide an assessment of human environmental impacts, or for public awareness of conservation objectives.

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          Can parasites really reveal environmental impact?

          This review assesses the usefulness of parasites as bioindicators of environmental impact. Relevant studies published in the past decade were compiled; factorial meta-analysis demonstrated significant effects and interactions between parasite levels and the presence and concentration of various pollutants and/or environmental stressors. These effects and interactions were also evident in subsets of studies that used different methods such as field surveys or experimental exposure. From this meta-analysis we conclude that parasites are useful bioindicators of environmental impact. Further, by examining aspects of study design, we put forward recommendations for the design of future studies to evaluate anthropogenic impact on host-parasite interactions and increase the efficiency of environmental monitoring programs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            The suitability of ammonium picrate-glycerin in preparing slides of lower Monogenoidea

             R Ergens,  R. ERGENS,  R Ergens (1969)
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              Environmental factors associated with fish assemblage patterns in a high gradient river of the Gulf of Mexico slope

              Using multivariate analyses of fish community and environmental data, we explored associations among 13 fish species and 9 ecological guilds and identified ecological gradients that explain patterns in the fish community of the La Antigua River (Veracruz, Mexico). Altitude, distance to ocean, stream width, and water temperature were the most important variables explaining community composition. Sites with high altitudes (> 1 393 m), cold water ( 100 km) and less than 5 m wide were dominated by non-native Onchorhynchus mykiss. Many sites exclusively inhabited by native poeciliids were also narrow ( 80 km, 20°C). Because 7 guilds were exclusive to a single species, results from the guild analysis were very similar to species-specific analyses. Higher species and guild diversity were found in wider sites (> 5 m), sites with lower altitudes (< 600 m), and sites closer to the ocean (< 71 km). Variables related to human influence did not explain trends found in the fish communities.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Data Brief
                Data Brief
                Data in Brief
                Elsevier
                2352-3409
                16 August 2020
                October 2020
                16 August 2020
                : 32
                Affiliations
                [a ]Instituto de Biología, Laboratorio de Helmintología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Ciudad de México, Mexico
                [b ]Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Laboratorio de Parasitología de Animales Silvestres, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico
                [c ]Instituto de Ecología, Pesquerías y Oceanografía del Golfo de México (EPOMEX), Universidad Autónoma de Campeche, San Francisco de Campeche, Campeche, Mexico
                [d ]Instituto de Ecología, A. C., km 2.5 Antigua Carretera a Coatepec, 91070, Xalapa, Veracruz, México
                [e ]Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico
                [f ]Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Ciencias y Artes de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. gsalgado@ 123456ib.unam.mx
                Article
                S2352-3409(20)31074-X 106180
                10.1016/j.dib.2020.106180
                7452639
                © 2020 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Agricultural and Biological Science

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