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      A cholinomimetic model of motion sickness and space adaptation syndrome.

      Aviation, space, and environmental medicine

      Adaptation, Physiological, drug effects, Adolescent, Adult, Behavior, Blood Pressure, Catecholamines, blood, Hormones, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Motion Sickness, chemically induced, Nausea, Physostigmine, pharmacology, Pulse, Space Flight, Syndrome

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          Abstract

          The space adaptation syndrome is one of the more vexing problems confronted by our nation's astronauts during their journeys. This syndrome may be a variant of motion sickness, although this possibility has been questioned. Physostigmine, a centrally active cholinesterase inhibitor which increases brain acetylcholine, was found to cause a motion sickness-like syndrome--in psychiatric patients and normals--including nausea, emesis, malaise, dysphoria, increases in serum ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, and prolactin, Neostigmine, a non-centrally acting cholinesterase inhibitor, and saline placebo caused no such effects. The above effects closely parallel those of motion sickness. Thus, the effects of physostigmine may be a convenient model for screening for treatments for motion sickness or space adaptation syndrome, or for predicting who will develop these syndromes.

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          6487203

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