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      Seroprävalenz und SARS-CoV-2-Testung in Gesundheitsberufen Translated title: Seroprevalence and SARS-CoV-2 testing in healthcare occupations

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          Abstract

          SARS-CoV‑2 verursacht ein Krankheitsspektrum, das auch asymptomatische und wenig symptomatische Infektionen mit subklinischen Manifestationen einschließt, die aber dennoch potenziell ansteckend sein können. Hinweise von SARS-CoV-2-infizierten Makaken und aus Studien mit saisonalen Coronaviren deuten darauf hin, dass die Infektion wahrscheinlich eine Immunität erzeugt, die für eine gewisse Zeit protektiv ist. Verfügbare Testmethoden ermöglichen ein hohes Maß an Zuverlässigkeit, falls qualitativ hochwertige serologische Methoden kombiniert werden. Obwohl individuelle Testergebnisse vorsichtig interpretiert werden, kann Sero-Surveillance in einer Klinik der Maximalversorgung und einem Forschungsinstitut Ängste abbauen und Klarheit in Bezug auf die tatsächliche Durchseuchung mit SARS-CoV‑2 schaffen.

          Translated abstract

          The SARS-CoV‑2 causes a disease spectrum that includes asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic infections with subclinical manifestations but which can nevertheless still be potentially contagious. Evidence from SARS-CoV‑2 infected macaque monkeys and from studies with seasonal coronaviruses suggests that the infection is likely to produce an immunity that is protective for a certain period of time. Available test methods enable a high degree of reliability, e.g. if high-quality serological methods are combined. Although individual test results have to be interpreted with caution, serosurveillance in a tertiary eye care center and large eye research institute can reduce anxiety and provide clarity regarding the actual number of (unreported) SARS-CoV‑2 infections.

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          Most cited references 41

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          Detection of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by real-time RT-PCR

          Background The ongoing outbreak of the recently emerged novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) poses a challenge for public health laboratories as virus isolates are unavailable while there is growing evidence that the outbreak is more widespread than initially thought, and international spread through travellers does already occur. Aim We aimed to develop and deploy robust diagnostic methodology for use in public health laboratory settings without having virus material available. Methods Here we present a validated diagnostic workflow for 2019-nCoV, its design relying on close genetic relatedness of 2019-nCoV with SARS coronavirus, making use of synthetic nucleic acid technology. Results The workflow reliably detects 2019-nCoV, and further discriminates 2019-nCoV from SARS-CoV. Through coordination between academic and public laboratories, we confirmed assay exclusivity based on 297 original clinical specimens containing a full spectrum of human respiratory viruses. Control material is made available through European Virus Archive – Global (EVAg), a European Union infrastructure project. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the enormous response capacity achieved through coordination of academic and public laboratories in national and European research networks.
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            Antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in patients with COVID-19

            We report acute antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in 285 patients with COVID-19. Within 19 days after symptom onset, 100% of patients tested positive for antiviral immunoglobulin-G (IgG). Seroconversion for IgG and IgM occurred simultaneously or sequentially. Both IgG and IgM titers plateaued within 6 days after seroconversion. Serological testing may be helpful for the diagnosis of suspected patients with negative RT-PCR results and for the identification of asymptomatic infections.
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              Projecting the transmission dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 through the postpandemic period

              It is urgent to understand the future of severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission. We used estimates of seasonality, immunity, and cross-immunity for betacoronaviruses OC43 and HKU1 from time series data from the USA to inform a model of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. We projected that recurrent wintertime outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2 will probably occur after the initial, most severe pandemic wave. Absent other interventions, a key metric for the success of social distancing is whether critical care capacities are exceeded. To avoid this, prolonged or intermittent social distancing may be necessary into 2022. Additional interventions, including expanded critical care capacity and an effective therapeutic, would improve the success of intermittent distancing and hasten the acquisition of herd immunity. Longitudinal serological studies are urgently needed to determine the extent and duration of immunity to SARS-CoV-2. Even in the event of apparent elimination, SARS-CoV-2 surveillance should be maintained since a resurgence in contagion could be possible as late as 2024.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                focke.ziemssen@med.uni-tuebingen.de
                Journal
                Ophthalmologe
                Ophthalmologe
                Der Ophthalmologe
                Springer Medizin (Heidelberg )
                0941-293X
                1433-0423
                25 June 2020
                : 1-7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.10392.39, ISNI 0000 0001 2190 1447, Augenklinik, Department für Augenheilkunde, , Eberhardt Karls Universität Tübingen, ; Tübingen, Deutschland
                [2 ]GRID grid.10392.39, ISNI 0000 0001 2190 1447, Department für Augenheilkunde, , Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, ; Elfriede-Aulhorn-Str. 7, 72076 Tübingen, Deutschland
                [3 ]GRID grid.10392.39, ISNI 0000 0001 2190 1447, Institut für Klinische Chemie und Pathobiochemie, , Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, ; Tübingen, Deutschland
                [4 ]GRID grid.10392.39, ISNI 0000 0001 2190 1447, Institut für Diabetes Forschung und Metabolische Erkrankungen des Helmholtz-Zentrums München, , Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, ; Tübingen, Deutschland
                [5 ]GRID grid.10392.39, ISNI 0000 0001 2190 1447, Forschungsinstitut für Augenheilkunde, Department für Augenheilkunde, , Eberhardt Karls Universität Tübingen, ; Tübingen, Deutschland
                Article
                1158
                10.1007/s00347-020-01158-7
                7315906
                © Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2020

                This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted research re-use and secondary analysis in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic.

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