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      Mapping single molecule sequencing reads using basic local alignment with successive refinement (BLASR): application and theory

      research-article
      1 , 2 ,
      BMC Bioinformatics
      BioMed Central

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          Abstract

          Background

          Recent methods have been developed to perform high-throughput sequencing of DNA by Single Molecule Sequencing (SMS). While Next-Generation sequencing methods may produce reads up to several hundred bases long, SMS sequencing produces reads up to tens of kilobases long. Existing alignment methods are either too inefficient for high-throughput datasets, or not sensitive enough to align SMS reads, which have a higher error rate than Next-Generation sequencing.

          Results

          We describe the method BLASR (Basic Local Alignment with Successive Refinement) for mapping Single Molecule Sequencing (SMS) reads that are thousands of bases long, with divergence between the read and genome dominated by insertion and deletion error. The method is benchmarked using both simulated reads and reads from a bacterial sequencing project. We also present a combinatorial model of sequencing error that motivates why our approach is effective.

          Conclusions

          The results indicate that it is possible to map SMS reads with high accuracy and speed. Furthermore, the inferences made on the mapability of SMS reads using our combinatorial model of sequencing error are in agreement with the mapping accuracy demonstrated on simulated reads.

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          Most cited references33

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          Fast and accurate short read alignment with Burrows–Wheeler transform

          Motivation: The enormous amount of short reads generated by the new DNA sequencing technologies call for the development of fast and accurate read alignment programs. A first generation of hash table-based methods has been developed, including MAQ, which is accurate, feature rich and fast enough to align short reads from a single individual. However, MAQ does not support gapped alignment for single-end reads, which makes it unsuitable for alignment of longer reads where indels may occur frequently. The speed of MAQ is also a concern when the alignment is scaled up to the resequencing of hundreds of individuals. Results: We implemented Burrows-Wheeler Alignment tool (BWA), a new read alignment package that is based on backward search with Burrows–Wheeler Transform (BWT), to efficiently align short sequencing reads against a large reference sequence such as the human genome, allowing mismatches and gaps. BWA supports both base space reads, e.g. from Illumina sequencing machines, and color space reads from AB SOLiD machines. Evaluations on both simulated and real data suggest that BWA is ∼10–20× faster than MAQ, while achieving similar accuracy. In addition, BWA outputs alignment in the new standard SAM (Sequence Alignment/Map) format. Variant calling and other downstream analyses after the alignment can be achieved with the open source SAMtools software package. Availability: http://maq.sourceforge.net Contact: rd@sanger.ac.uk
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            Basic local alignment search tool.

            A new approach to rapid sequence comparison, basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), directly approximates alignments that optimize a measure of local similarity, the maximal segment pair (MSP) score. Recent mathematical results on the stochastic properties of MSP scores allow an analysis of the performance of this method as well as the statistical significance of alignments it generates. The basic algorithm is simple and robust; it can be implemented in a number of ways and applied in a variety of contexts including straightforward DNA and protein sequence database searches, motif searches, gene identification searches, and in the analysis of multiple regions of similarity in long DNA sequences. In addition to its flexibility and tractability to mathematical analysis, BLAST is an order of magnitude faster than existing sequence comparison tools of comparable sensitivity.
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              Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs.

              S Altschul (1997)
              The BLAST programs are widely used tools for searching protein and DNA databases for sequence similarities. For protein comparisons, a variety of definitional, algorithmic and statistical refinements described here permits the execution time of the BLAST programs to be decreased substantially while enhancing their sensitivity to weak similarities. A new criterion for triggering the extension of word hits, combined with a new heuristic for generating gapped alignments, yields a gapped BLAST program that runs at approximately three times the speed of the original. In addition, a method is introduced for automatically combining statistically significant alignments produced by BLAST into a position-specific score matrix, and searching the database using this matrix. The resulting Position-Specific Iterated BLAST (PSI-BLAST) program runs at approximately the same speed per iteration as gapped BLAST, but in many cases is much more sensitive to weak but biologically relevant sequence similarities. PSI-BLAST is used to uncover several new and interesting members of the BRCT superfamily.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMC Bioinformatics
                BMC Bioinformatics
                BMC Bioinformatics
                BioMed Central
                1471-2105
                2012
                19 September 2012
                : 13
                : 238
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department Secondary Analysis, Pacific Biosciences, 1005 Hamilton Rd, CA, Menlo Park, USA
                [2 ]Department of Mathematics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr, CA, La Jolla, USA
                Article
                1471-2105-13-238
                10.1186/1471-2105-13-238
                3572422
                22988817
                f3d1fe4c-cc92-4b04-bd00-c5de21846b91
                Copyright ©2012 Chaisson and Tesler; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Methodology Article

                Bioinformatics & Computational biology
                Bioinformatics & Computational biology

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