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      Group Laziness: The Effect of Social Loafing on Group Performance

      , , , ,
      Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
      Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd

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          Abstract

          Social loafing has been defined as a phenomenon in which people exhibit a sizable decrease in individual effort when performing in groups as compared to when they perform alone, and has been regarded as a state variable. In this study, we instead conceptualized social loafing as a habitual response, given that many people have been found to be susceptible to social loafing in group tasks. We developed the self-reported Social Loafing Tendency Questionnaire (SLTQ) to measure individual variations in social loafing. In Study 1, the reliability and validity of the SLTQ were established in a sample of college students. In Study 2, SLTQ scores significantly negatively predicted individual performance in the group task condition, but not in the individual task condition. Social loafing can also be considered a trait variable, as it was found to modulate group dynamics when it was activated in a typical situation (i.e., being in a group).

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
          soc behav pers
          Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd
          0301-2212
          April 15 2014
          April 15 2014
          : 42
          : 3
          : 465-471
          Article
          10.2224/sbp.2014.42.3.465
          f3e044da-a50c-4850-95b3-c59843836e98
          © 2014
          History

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