6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      HPIPred: Host–pathogen interactome prediction with phenotypic scoring

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Graphical abstract

          Abstract

          Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in most cellular processes. Unfortunately, current knowledge of host-pathogen interactomes is still very limited. Experimental methods used to detect PPIs have several limitations, including increasing complexity and economic cost in large-scale screenings. Hence, computational methods are commonly used to support experimental data, although they generally suffer from high false-positive rates. To address this issue, we have created HPIPred, a host-pathogen PPI prediction tool based on numerical encoding of physicochemical properties. Unlike other available methods, HPIPred integrates phenotypic data to prioritize biologically meaningful results. We used HPIPred to screen the entire Homo sapiens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 proteomes to generate a host-pathogen interactome with 763 interactions displaying a highly connected network topology. Our predictive model can be used to prioritize protein–protein interactions as potential targets for antibacterial drug development. Available at: https://github.com/SysBioUAB/hpi_predictor .

          Related collections

          Most cited references31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Cytoscape: a software environment for integrated models of biomolecular interaction networks.

          Cytoscape is an open source software project for integrating biomolecular interaction networks with high-throughput expression data and other molecular states into a unified conceptual framework. Although applicable to any system of molecular components and interactions, Cytoscape is most powerful when used in conjunction with large databases of protein-protein, protein-DNA, and genetic interactions that are increasingly available for humans and model organisms. Cytoscape's software Core provides basic functionality to layout and query the network; to visually integrate the network with expression profiles, phenotypes, and other molecular states; and to link the network to databases of functional annotations. The Core is extensible through a straightforward plug-in architecture, allowing rapid development of additional computational analyses and features. Several case studies of Cytoscape plug-ins are surveyed, including a search for interaction pathways correlating with changes in gene expression, a study of protein complexes involved in cellular recovery to DNA damage, inference of a combined physical/functional interaction network for Halobacterium, and an interface to detailed stochastic/kinetic gene regulatory models.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Systematic and integrative analysis of large gene lists using DAVID bioinformatics resources.

            DAVID bioinformatics resources consists of an integrated biological knowledgebase and analytic tools aimed at systematically extracting biological meaning from large gene/protein lists. This protocol explains how to use DAVID, a high-throughput and integrated data-mining environment, to analyze gene lists derived from high-throughput genomic experiments. The procedure first requires uploading a gene list containing any number of common gene identifiers followed by analysis using one or more text and pathway-mining tools such as gene functional classification, functional annotation chart or clustering and functional annotation table. By following this protocol, investigators are able to gain an in-depth understanding of the biological themes in lists of genes that are enriched in genome-scale studies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Global burden of bacterial antimicrobial resistance in 2019: a systematic analysis

              (2022)
              Summary Background Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a major threat to human health around the world. Previous publications have estimated the effect of AMR on incidence, deaths, hospital length of stay, and health-care costs for specific pathogen–drug combinations in select locations. To our knowledge, this study presents the most comprehensive estimates of AMR burden to date. Methods We estimated deaths and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) attributable to and associated with bacterial AMR for 23 pathogens and 88 pathogen–drug combinations in 204 countries and territories in 2019. We obtained data from systematic literature reviews, hospital systems, surveillance systems, and other sources, covering 471 million individual records or isolates and 7585 study-location-years. We used predictive statistical modelling to produce estimates of AMR burden for all locations, including for locations with no data. Our approach can be divided into five broad components: number of deaths where infection played a role, proportion of infectious deaths attributable to a given infectious syndrome, proportion of infectious syndrome deaths attributable to a given pathogen, the percentage of a given pathogen resistant to an antibiotic of interest, and the excess risk of death or duration of an infection associated with this resistance. Using these components, we estimated disease burden based on two counterfactuals: deaths attributable to AMR (based on an alternative scenario in which all drug-resistant infections were replaced by drug-susceptible infections), and deaths associated with AMR (based on an alternative scenario in which all drug-resistant infections were replaced by no infection). We generated 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) for final estimates as the 25th and 975th ordered values across 1000 posterior draws, and models were cross-validated for out-of-sample predictive validity. We present final estimates aggregated to the global and regional level. Findings On the basis of our predictive statistical models, there were an estimated 4·95 million (3·62–6·57) deaths associated with bacterial AMR in 2019, including 1·27 million (95% UI 0·911–1·71) deaths attributable to bacterial AMR. At the regional level, we estimated the all-age death rate attributable to resistance to be highest in western sub-Saharan Africa, at 27·3 deaths per 100 000 (20·9–35·3), and lowest in Australasia, at 6·5 deaths (4·3–9·4) per 100 000. Lower respiratory infections accounted for more than 1·5 million deaths associated with resistance in 2019, making it the most burdensome infectious syndrome. The six leading pathogens for deaths associated with resistance (Escherichia coli, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were responsible for 929 000 (660 000–1 270 000) deaths attributable to AMR and 3·57 million (2·62–4·78) deaths associated with AMR in 2019. One pathogen–drug combination, meticillin-resistant S aureus, caused more than 100 000 deaths attributable to AMR in 2019, while six more each caused 50 000–100 000 deaths: multidrug-resistant excluding extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E coli, carbapenem-resistant A baumannii, fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli, carbapenem-resistant K pneumoniae, and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant K pneumoniae. Interpretation To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global burden of AMR, as well as an evaluation of the availability of data. AMR is a leading cause of death around the world, with the highest burdens in low-resource settings. Understanding the burden of AMR and the leading pathogen–drug combinations contributing to it is crucial to making informed and location-specific policy decisions, particularly about infection prevention and control programmes, access to essential antibiotics, and research and development of new vaccines and antibiotics. There are serious data gaps in many low-income settings, emphasising the need to expand microbiology laboratory capacity and data collection systems to improve our understanding of this important human health threat. Funding Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and Department of Health and Social Care using UK aid funding managed by the Fleming Fund.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Comput Struct Biotechnol J
                Comput Struct Biotechnol J
                Computational and Structural Biotechnology Journal
                Research Network of Computational and Structural Biotechnology
                2001-0370
                21 November 2022
                2022
                21 November 2022
                : 20
                : 6534-6542
                Affiliations
                Systems Biology of Infection Lab, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. marc.torrent@ 123456uab.cat
                [1]

                Present address: University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine, and Cologne University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Integrated Oncology Aachen, Bonn, Cologne, Düsseldorf, CECAD Cologne Cluster of Excellence on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases, Cologne, Germany.

                Article
                S2001-0370(22)00520-7
                10.1016/j.csbj.2022.11.026
                9718936
                36514317
                f3fb421b-0d7f-4f73-b0cd-9c8d4c16f43e
                © 2022 The Author(s)

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                History
                : 15 August 2022
                : 9 November 2022
                : 10 November 2022
                Categories
                Research Article

                protein-protein interaction,host,pathogen,bacteria,pseudomonas aeruginosa,pao1,interactome,ppi, protein-protein interaction,ccc, cross-correlation coefficient,bc, betweenness centrality,fpr, false positive rate,roc, receiver-operating characteristic,pr, precision-recall

                Comments

                Comment on this article