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      Assessing Human Exposure to Organic Pollutants in the Indoor Environment

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          Atmospheric aerosols: composition, transformation, climate and health effects.

          Aerosols are of central importance for atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. The airborne solid and liquid particles in the nanometer to micrometer size range influence the energy balance of the Earth, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric circulation, and the abundance of greenhouse and reactive trace gases. Moreover, they play important roles in the reproduction of biological organisms and can cause or enhance diseases. The primary parameters that determine the environmental and health effects of aerosol particles are their concentration, size, structure, and chemical composition. These parameters, however, are spatially and temporally highly variable. The quantification and identification of biological particles and carbonaceous components of fine particulate matter in the air (organic compounds and black or elemental carbon, respectively) represent demanding analytical challenges. This Review outlines the current state of knowledge, major open questions, and research perspectives on the properties and interactions of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on climate and human health.
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            Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) by glass capillary gas chromatography

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              Measurements of volatile organic compounds in the earth's atmosphere using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.

              Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) allows real-time measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air with a high sensitivity and a fast time response. The use of PTR-MS in atmospheric research has expanded rapidly in recent years, and much has been learned about the instrument response and specificity of the technique in the analysis of air from different regions of the atmosphere. This paper aims to review the progress that has been made. The theory of operation is described and allows the response of the instrument to be described for different operating conditions. More accurate determinations of the instrument response involve calibrations using standard mixtures, and some results are shown. Much has been learned about the specificity of PTR-MS from inter-comparison studies as well the coupling of PTR-MS with a gas chromatographic interface. The literature on this issue is reviewed and summarized for many VOCs of atmospheric interest. Some highlights of airborne measurements by PTR-MS are presented, including the results obtained in fresh and aged forest-fire and urban plumes. Finally, the recent work that is focused on improving the technique is discussed. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Angewandte Chemie International Edition
                Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
                Wiley
                14337851
                August 13 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Material Analysis and Indoor Chemistry; Fraunhofer WKI; 38108 Braunschweig Bienroder Weg 54E Germany
                [2 ]Department of Building Science; Tsinghua University; Beijing Key Laboratory of Indoor Air Quality Evaluation and Control; Beijing 100084 PR China
                [3 ]Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance (IPA); Institute of the Ruhr-University Bochum; 44789 Bochum Bürkle-de-la-Camp Platz 1 Germany
                [4 ]Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI); Rutgers University; 170 Frelinghuysen Road Piscataway NJ 08854 USA
                Article
                10.1002/anie.201711023
                © 2018

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