Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Early Cancer Detection Behaviors among Black Males

,

Journal of Men's Health

Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisher
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Background and Objective: It is believed that the differentials in the chances of surviving cancer diagnoses may be due to barriers that limit access to timely, appropriate, and high-quality medical care. Understanding the motivation for early cancer detection behavior among Black males may begin to diminish the prevalence of having an imminent and aggressive cancer diagnosis among this gendered population. To add to this understanding, this study examined perceptions, beliefs, and engagement in early detection cancer behavior in a sample of Black males 23-63 years of age. Materials and Methods: Participants (N=312) responded to survey items assessing knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions of cancer, early cancer detection behavior, illness attitude, masculinity, attachment style, and demographic characteristics via a Qualtrics link published on Amazon MTurk. Using hierarchical regression models, associations were estimated between demographic variables, social (illness attitude, identity), behavioral (masculinity, attachment) variables, and early cancer detection behavior. Results: Data showed age (b = -.28, p<.01), education (b = -.180, p<.01), illness attitude (b = .24, p<.01), masculinity (b = -.22, p<.01), and avoidant (b = .31, p<.01) and anxious (b = -.14, p<.01) attachment being associated with early cancer detection behavior among Black males. Conclusion: Understanding the motivation for early cancer detection behaviors may begin to address the use of mechanisms, by which to ensure a timely diagnosis, of preventable cancers, among this adult population. Our findings should be useful for researchers seeking to understand why people resist beneficial health information, and for practitioners who aim to create interventions that may reduce such resistance.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 21

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Cancer statistics for African Americans, 2016: Progress and opportunities in reducing racial disparities.

      In this article, the American Cancer Society provides the estimated number of new cancer cases and deaths for blacks in the United States and the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, screening, and risk factors for cancer. Incidence data are from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, and mortality data are from the National Center for Health Statistics. Approximately 189,910 new cases of cancer and 69,410 cancer deaths will occur among blacks in 2016. Although blacks continue to have higher cancer death rates than whites, the disparity has narrowed for all cancers combined in men and women and for lung and prostate cancers in men. In contrast, the racial gap in death rates has widened for breast cancer in women and remained level for colorectal cancer in men. The reduction in overall cancer death rates since the early 1990s translates to the avoidance of more than 300,000 deaths among blacks. In men, incidence rates from 2003 to 2012 decreased for all cancers combined (by 2.0% per year) as well as for the top 3 cancer sites (prostate, lung, and colorectal). In women, overall rates during the corresponding time period remained unchanged, reflecting increasing trends in breast cancer combined with decreasing trends in lung and colorectal cancer rates. Five-year relative survival is lower for blacks than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors remains an active area of research. Progress in reducing cancer death rates could be accelerated by ensuring equitable access to prevention, early detection, and high-quality treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:290-308. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Conceptualization and measurement of ethnic identity: Current status and future directions.

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Effect of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

          Objectives To review, summarise, and compare the evidence for effectiveness of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy in the prevention of colorectal cancer occurrence and deaths. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies. Data sources PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Two investigators independently extracted characteristics and results of identified studies and performed standardised quality ratings. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials and observational studies in English on the impact of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in the general population at average risk. Results For screening sigmoidoscopy, four randomised controlled trials and 10 observational studies were identified that consistently found a major reduction in distal but not proximal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Summary estimates of reduction in distal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality were 31% (95% confidence intervals 26% to 37%) and 46% (33% to 57%) in intention to screen analysis, 42% (29% to 53%) and 61% (27% to 79%) in per protocol analysis of randomised controlled trials, and 64% (50% to 74%) and 66% (38% to 81%) in observational studies. For screening colonoscopy, evidence was restricted to six observational studies, the results of which suggest tentatively an even stronger reduction in distal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, along with a significant reduction in mortality from cancer of the proximal colon. Indirect comparisons of results of observational studies on screening sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggest a 40% to 60% lower risk of incident colorectal cancer and death from colorectal cancer after screening colonoscopy even though this incremental risk reduction was statistically significant for deaths from cancer of the proximal colon only. Conclusions Compelling and consistent evidence from randomised controlled trials and observational studies suggests that screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy prevent most deaths from distal colorectal cancer. Observational studies suggest that colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy decreases mortality from cancer of the proximal colon. This added value should be examined in further research and weighed against the higher costs, discomfort, complication rates, capacities needed, and possible differences in compliance.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            Journal of Men's Health
            J Men's Health
            Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
            1875-6859
            June 07 2018
            June 08 2018
            : 14
            : 3
            : e3-e13
            10.22374/1875-6859.14.3.4
            © 2018

            Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

            Product
            Self URI (journal page): http://jomh.org/index.php/JMH/index
            Self URI (journal page): http://jomh.org/index.php/JMH/index

            Geriatric medicine, Urology, Sports medicine, Sexual medicine

            Comments

            Comment on this article