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      CD133 in brain tumor: the prognostic factor

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          Abstract

          CD133 has been shown to be an important stem cell factor that promotes glioma progression. However, the mechanism for CD133-mediated glioma progression has yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that CD133 mRNA expression was a prognostic marker in three independent glioma patient cohorts, corroborating a putative role for CD133 in glioma progression. Importantly, we found that CD133 expression in glioma was highly correlated with the expression of HOX gene stem cell factors (HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA10, HOXC4 and HOXC6). The expression of these HOX genes individually was significantly associated with survival. Interestingly, the prognostic significance of CD133 was dependent on the expression level of HOX genes, and vice versa. CD133 ( p = 0.021) and HOXA7 ( p = 0.001) were independent prognostic markers when the three glioma patient cohorts were combined ( n = 231). Our results suggest that HOX genes may play a more important role in progression of glioma when CD133 expression is low. Furthermore, we showed that low-level expression of LIM2 in CD133-high glioma was associated with poorer survival, suggesting that LIM2 could be a therapeutic target for glioma expressing a high level of CD133. Connectivity mapping identified vinblastine and vincristine as agents that could reverse the CD133/HOX genes/LIM2-signature, and we confirmed this by in vitro analysis in glioma cell lines, demonstrating that CD133 and HOX genes were co-expressed and could be downregulated by vincristine. In conclusion, our data show that CD133 and HOX genes are important prognostic markers in glioma and shed light on possible treatment strategies for glioma expressing a high level of CD133.

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          Most cited references 37

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          Molecular subclasses of high-grade glioma predict prognosis, delineate a pattern of disease progression, and resemble stages in neurogenesis.

          Previously undescribed prognostic subclasses of high-grade astrocytoma are identified and discovered to resemble stages in neurogenesis. One tumor class displaying neuronal lineage markers shows longer survival, while two tumor classes enriched for neural stem cell markers display equally short survival. Poor prognosis subclasses exhibit markers either of proliferation or of angiogenesis and mesenchyme. Upon recurrence, tumors frequently shift toward the mesenchymal subclass. Chromosomal locations of genes distinguishing tumor subclass parallel DNA copy number differences between subclasses. Functional relevance of tumor subtype molecular signatures is suggested by the ability of cell line signatures to predict neurosphere growth. A robust two-gene prognostic model utilizing PTEN and DLL3 expression suggests that Akt and Notch signaling are hallmarks of poor prognosis versus better prognosis gliomas, respectively.
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            Analysis of gene expression and chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

            Background Recently, a small population of cancer stem cells in adult and pediatric brain tumors has been identified. Some evidence has suggested that CD133 is a marker for a subset of leukemia and glioblastoma cancer stem cells. Especially, CD133 positive cells isolated from human glioblastoma may initiate tumors and represent novel targets for therapeutics. The gene expression and the drug resistance property of CD133 positive cancer stem cells, however, are still unknown. Results In this study, by FACS analysis we determined the percentage of CD133 positive cells in three primary cultured cell lines established from glioblastoma patients 10.2%, 69.7% and 27.5%, respectively. We also determined the average mRNA levels of markers associated with neural precursors. For example, CD90, CD44, CXCR4, Nestin, Msi1 and MELK mRNA on CD133 positive cells increased to 15.6, 5.7, 337.8, 21.4, 84 and 1351 times, respectively, compared to autologous CD133 negative cells derived from cell line No. 66. Additionally, CD133 positive cells express higher levels of BCRP1 and MGMT mRNA, as well as higher mRNA levels of genes that inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, CD133 positive cells were significantly resistant to chemotherapeutic agents including temozolomide, carboplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol) and etoposide (VP16) compared to autologous CD133 negative cells. Finally, CD133 expression was significantly higher in recurrent GBM tissue obtained from five patients as compared to their respective newly diagnosed tumors. Conclusion Our study for the first time provided evidence that CD133 positive cancer stem cells display strong capability on tumor's resistance to chemotherapy. This resistance is probably contributed by the CD133 positive cell with higher expression of on BCRP1 and MGMT, as well as the anti-apoptosis protein and inhibitors of apoptosis protein families. Future treatment should target this small population of CD133 positive cancer stem cells in tumors to improve the survival of brain tumor patients.
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              NOTCH pathway blockade depletes CD133-positive glioblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumor neurospheres and xenografts.

              Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be critical for the engraftment and long-term growth of many tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). The cells are at least partially spared by traditional chemotherapies and radiation therapies, and finding new treatments that can target CSCs may be critical for improving patient survival. It has been shown that the NOTCH signaling pathway regulates normal stem cells in the brain, and that GBMs contain stem-like cells with higher NOTCH activity. We therefore used low-passage and established GBM-derived neurosphere cultures to examine the overall requirement for NOTCH activity, and also examined the effects on tumor cells expressing stem cell markers. NOTCH blockade by gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) reduced neurosphere growth and clonogenicity in vitro, whereas expression of an active form of NOTCH2 increased tumor growth. The putative CSC markers CD133, NESTIN, BMI1, and OLIG2 were reduced following NOTCH blockade. When equal numbers of viable cells pretreated with either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) or GSI were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, the former always formed tumors, whereas the latter did not. In vivo delivery of GSI by implantation of drug-impregnated polymer beads also effectively blocked tumor growth, and significantly prolonged survival, albeit in a relatively small cohort of animals. We found that NOTCH pathway inhibition appears to deplete stem-like cancer cells through reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis associated with decreased AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation. In summary, we demonstrate that NOTCH pathway blockade depletes stem-like cells in GBMs, suggesting that GSIs may be useful as chemotherapeutic reagents to target CSCs in malignant gliomas.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                Oncotarget
                ImpactJ
                Oncotarget
                Impact Journals LLC
                1949-2553
                14 February 2017
                31 December 2016
                : 8
                : 7
                : 11144-11159
                Affiliations
                1 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida de Universidade, Taipa, Macau SAR
                2 School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom
                3 Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A*STAR, Singapore
                4 Department of Pathology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
                5 Northern Ireland Centre for Stratified Medicine, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, University of Ulster, Londonderry, United Kingdom
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Hang Fai Kwok, hfkwok@ 123456umac.mo
                Article
                14406
                10.18632/oncotarget.14406
                5355253
                28055976
                Copyright: © 2017 Li et al.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Paper

                Oncology & Radiotherapy

                brain tumor, cd133, hox, lim2, stem cell

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