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      Serum levels of zinc, calcium, and iron are associated with the risk of preeclampsia in pregnant women.

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          Abstract

          Evidence indicates that various elements, including antioxidant minerals, might play an important role in preeclampsia (PE). This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between serum mineral levelsof zinc, calcium, iron, and selenium and the risk of preeclampsia in Korean women. Twenty-nine normal controls and 30 women with preeclampsia were recruited for the study. Preeclampsia was defined as having high blood pressure (≥ 140/90 mm Hg after 20 weeks gestation) and proteinuria (≥300 mg/24 hours). Serum mineral content was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Serum zinc (P < .0001) and calcium (P = .0188) levels were lower in women with preeclampsia than those of normal women, while serum iron was significantly higher in women with preeclampsia (P = .0045). The odds ratio for preeclampsia was lower in women with higher serum zinc levels than those with lower levels after adjustment for age, height, and weight before delivery (P < .0001). The adjusted odds ratio for preeclampsia also decreased across tertiles of serum calcium concentration (P = .0452). However, there was an increased adjusted odds ratio for preeclampsia across tertiles of serum iron level (P = .0104). These results suggest that levels of serum minerals such as zinc, calcium, and iron may be associated with the risk of preeclampsia in Korean pregnant women.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nutr Res
          Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.)
          1879-0739
          0271-5317
          Oct 2012
          : 32
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Food and Nutrition, Daegu University, Gyeongsan, Republic of Korea.
          Article
          S0271-5317(12)00189-3
          10.1016/j.nutres.2012.09.007
          23146773
          Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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