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      Detection of small single-cycle signals by stochastic resonance using a bistable superconducting quantum interference device

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          Abstract

          We propose and experimentally demonstrate detecting small single-cycle and few-cycle signals by using the symmetric double-well potential of a radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID). We show that the response of this bistable system to single- and few-cycle signals has a non-monotonic dependence on the noise strength. The response, measured by the probability of transition from initial potential well to the opposite one, becomes maximum when the noise-induced transition rate between the two stable states of the rf-SQUID is comparable to the signal frequency. Comparison to numerical simulations shows that the phenomenon is a manifestation of stochastic resonance.

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          Reaction-rate theory: fifty years after Kramers

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            Stochastic resonance

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              Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits

               Franco Nori,  J. You (2012)
              Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                02 May 2015
                1505.00329 10.1063/1.4919539

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

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                Applied Physics Letters 106, 172602 (2015)
                5 pages 3 figures
                cond-mat.mes-hall cond-mat.stat-mech

                Condensed matter, Nanophysics

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