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      Comeback of epitaxial graphene for electronics: large-area growth of bilayer-free graphene on SiC

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          Abstract

          We present a new fabrication method for epitaxial graphene on SiC which enables the growth of ultra-smooth defect- and bilayer-free graphene sheets with an unprecedented reproducibility, a necessary prerequisite for wafer-scale fabrication of high quality graphene-based electronic devices. The inherent but unfavorable formation of high SiC surface terrace steps during high temperature sublimation growth is suppressed by rapid formation of the graphene buffer layer which stabilizes the SiC surface. The enhanced nucleation is enforced by decomposition of polymer adsorbates which act as a carbon source. With most of the steps well below 0.75 nm pure monolayer graphene without bilayer inclusions is formed with lateral dimensions only limited by the size of the substrate. This makes the polymer assisted sublimation growth technique the most promising method for commercial wafer scale epitaxial graphene fabrication. The extraordinary electronic quality is evidenced by quantum resistance metrology at 4.2 K with until now unreached precision and high electron mobilities on mm scale devices.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Interpretation of Raman spectra of disordered and amorphous carbon

          Physical Review B, 61(20), 14095-14107
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            Towards wafer-size graphene layers by atmospheric pressure graphitization of silicon carbide.

            Graphene, a single monolayer of graphite, has recently attracted considerable interest owing to its novel magneto-transport properties, high carrier mobility and ballistic transport up to room temperature. It has the potential for technological applications as a successor of silicon in the post Moore's law era, as a single-molecule gas sensor, in spintronics, in quantum computing or as a terahertz oscillator. For such applications, uniform ordered growth of graphene on an insulating substrate is necessary. The growth of graphene on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces by high-temperature annealing in vacuum was previously proposed to open a route for large-scale production of graphene-based devices. However, vacuum decomposition of SiC yields graphene layers with small grains (30-200 nm; refs 14-16). Here, we show that the ex situ graphitization of Si-terminated SiC(0001) in an argon atmosphere of about 1 bar produces monolayer graphene films with much larger domain sizes than previously attainable. Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements confirm the improved quality of the films thus obtained. High electronic mobilities were found, which reach mu=2,000 cm (2) V(-1) s(-1) at T=27 K. The new growth process introduced here establishes a method for the synthesis of graphene films on a technologically viable basis.
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              Interaction, growth, and ordering of epitaxial graphene on SiC{0001} surfaces: A comparative photoelectron spectroscopy study

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2016-06-06
                Article
                1606.01709
                f734257c-ae54-4618-8a72-69cf3d86d1a1

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                20 pages, 6 Figures
                cond-mat.mtrl-sci

                Condensed matter

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