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      Burnout in emergency department staff: The prevalence and barriers to intervention

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          Abstract

          Background

          Burnout impacts patient care and staff well-being. Emergency department (ED) staff are at an elevated risk for burnout. Despite an acceleration in burnout research due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there is limited data on the nature and prevalence of burnout in the South African emergency medicine setting.

          Aim

          This study determined the prevalence of burnout in ED staff (doctors, nurses and non-clinical staff) at Tygerberg Hospital and explored staff awareness and utilisation of interventions.

          Setting

          The study was conducted at Tygerberg Hospital, South Africa.

          Methods

          This cross-sectional study used the Maslach Burnout Inventory to assess burnout via a self-administered electronic survey in a convenience sample of 109 ED staff. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis.

          Results

          A total of 46 participants (45.10%) experienced burnout, with 73 participants (71.57%) at high risk for emotional exhaustion or depersonalisation. The prevalence of burnout in doctors was 57.89%, non-clinical staff was 25.93%, and nursing staff was 50.00%. Burnout was higher in doctors and nursing staff compared to non-clinical staff, with high emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation found in interns and specialist professional nurses. The level of intervention awareness was 41.8% and the level of intervention utilisation was 8.82%. Thematic analysis identified awareness, accessibility and reactive utilisation as barriers to utilisation with opportunities to reduce burnout and enhance resilience.

          Conclusion

          Coordinated health system and organisational efforts are required to optimise intervention strategies to reduce burnout.

          Contribution

          Guidance on the design and planning of intervention strategies considering at risk groups, intervention-related factors, and non-clinical staff.

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          Most cited references73

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          Using thematic analysis in psychology

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            Thematic Analysis

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              The measurement of experienced burnout

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                S Afr J Psychiatr
                S Afr J Psychiatr
                SAJPsy
                The South African Journal of Psychiatry : SAJP : the Journal of the Society of Psychiatrists of South Africa
                AOSIS
                1608-9685
                2078-6786
                23 October 2023
                2023
                : 29
                : 2095
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences, Stellenbosch Business School, Cape Town, South Africa
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Reshen Naidoo, reshen.naidoo@ 123456gmail.com
                Author information
                https://orcid.org/0009-0009-2181-1949
                https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1563-7517
                Article
                SAJPsy-29-2095
                10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v29i0.2095
                10623583
                f7429508-83bf-4c59-acf5-c0fac52d15f6
                © 2023. The Authors

                Licensee: AOSIS. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

                History
                : 19 April 2023
                : 01 September 2023
                Categories
                Original Research

                burnout,prevalence,healthcare,hospital,emergency care,intervention,doctors,nurses,non-clinical

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