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      Pemphigus group: overview, epidemiology, mortality, and comorbidities

      Immunologic Research
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Paraneoplastic pemphigus. An autoimmune mucocutaneous disease associated with neoplasia.

          We describe five patients with underlying neoplasms in whom painful mucosal ulcerations and polymorphous skin lesions developed, usually with progression to blistering eruptions on the trunk and extremities. Histologic examination showed vacuolization of epidermal basal cells, keratinocyte necrosis, and acantholysis. Immunofluorescence testing revealed atypical pemphigus-like autoantibodies in perilesional epithelium and serum from all five patients. We studied the antigenic specificities of the autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation, using extracts of 14C-labeled human keratinocytes. IgG purified from the serum of one patient was passively transferred to four neonatal mice to test for pathogenicity. Immunofluorescence testing showed that the autoantibodies bound to the surface of tissues containing desmosomes, including complex and simple epithelia, and myocardium. An identical and unique complex of four polypeptides with molecular weights of 250, 230, 210, and 190 was immunoprecipitated by all serum samples. The 250-kd polypeptide comigrated with desmoplakin I (a protein found in the desmosomes of all epithelia), and the 230-kd antigen comigrated with the antigen of bullous pemphigoid. Cutaneous blisters, a positive Nikolsky's sign, and epidermal and esophageal acantholysis developed in all mice into which the autoantibody was injected. Electron microscopy showed epidermal acantholysis similar to lesions of experimentally induced pemphigus vulgaris. These five patients with cancer had a novel acantholytic mucocutaneous disease characterized by autoantibodies that were pathogenic after passive transfer. The autoantibodies from these patients reacted with an antigen complex composed of desmoplakin I and the 230-kd antigen of bullous pemphigoid and two as yet unidentified epithelial antigens. We suggest the term "paraneoplastic pemphigus" for this disease.
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            Mechanisms of Disease: Pemphigus and Bullous Pemphigoid.

            Pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid are autoantibody-mediated blistering skin diseases. In pemphigus, keratinocytes in epidermis and mucous membranes lose cell-cell adhesion, and in pemphigoid, the basal keratinocytes lose adhesion to the basement membrane. Pemphigus lesions are mediated directly by the autoantibodies, whereas the autoantibodies in pemphigoid fix complement and mediate inflammation. In both diseases, the autoantigens have been cloned and characterized; pemphigus antigens are desmogleins (cell adhesion molecules in desmosomes), and pemphigoid antigens are found in hemidesmosomes (which mediate adhesion to the basement membrane). This knowledge has enabled diagnostic testing for these diseases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and dissection of various pathophysiological mechanisms, including direct inhibition of cell adhesion, antibody-induced internalization of antigen, and cell signaling. Understanding these mechanisms of disease has led to rational targeted therapeutic strategies.
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              Explanations for the clinical and microscopic localization of lesions in pemphigus foliaceus and vulgaris.

              Patients with pemphigus foliaceus (PF) have blisters on skin, but not mucous membranes, whereas patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) develop blisters on mucous membranes and/or skin. PF and PV blisters are due to loss of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion in the superficial and deep epidermis, respectively. PF autoantibodies are directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 1; PV autoantibodies bind Dsg3 or both Dsg3 and Dsg1. In this study, we test the hypothesis that coexpression of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in keratinocytes protects against pathology due to antibody-induced dysfunction of either one alone. Using passive transfer of pemphigus IgG to normal and DSG3(null) neonatal mice, we show that in the areas of epidermis and mucous membrane that coexpress Dsg1 and Dsg3, antibodies against either desmoglein alone do not cause spontaneous blisters, but antibodies against both do. In areas (such as superficial epidermis of normal mice) where Dsg1 without Dsg3 is expressed, anti-Dsg1 antibodies alone can cause blisters. Thus, the anti-desmoglein antibody profiles in pemphigus sera and the normal tissue distributions of Dsg1 and Dsg3 determine the sites of blister formation. These studies suggest that pemphigus autoantibodies inhibit the adhesive function of desmoglein proteins, and demonstrate that either Dsg1 or Dsg3 alone is sufficient to maintain keratinocyte adhesion.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Immunologic Research
                Immunol Res
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0257-277X
                1559-0755
                April 2018
                February 26 2018
                April 2018
                : 66
                : 2
                : 255-270
                Article
                10.1007/s12026-018-8986-7
                29479654
                f7bad90e-433d-44e2-be11-37cbe71a0795
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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