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Manganese based layered oxides with modulated electronic and thermodynamic properties for sodium ion batteries

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      Abstract

      Manganese based layered oxides have received increasing attention as cathode materials for sodium ion batteries due to their high theoretical capacities and good sodium ion conductivities. However, the Jahn–Teller distortion arising from the manganese (III) centers destabilizes the host structure and deteriorates the cycling life. Herein, we report that zinc-doped Na 0.833[Li 0.25Mn 0.75]O 2 can not only suppress the Jahn–Teller effect but also reduce the inherent phase separations. The reduction of manganese (III) amount in the zinc-doped sample, as predicted by first-principles calculations, has been confirmed by its high binding energies and the reduced octahedral structural variations. In the viewpoint of thermodynamics, the zinc-doped sample has lower formation energy, more stable ground states, and fewer spinodal decomposition regions than those of the undoped sample, all of which make it charge or discharge without any phase transition. Hence, the zinc-doped sample shows superior cycling performance, demonstrating that zinc doping is an effective strategy for developing high-performance layered cathode materials.

      Abstract

      Mn-based layered oxides are promising cathode materials for next generation sodium ion batteries. To address two existing issues facing the system, here the authors show that a simple zinc doping can suppress both Jahn–Teller distortion and phase separation, enabling enhanced cycling performance.

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      Most cited references 55

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      Li-O2 and Li-S batteries with high energy storage.

      Li-ion batteries have transformed portable electronics and will play a key role in the electrification of transport. However, the highest energy storage possible for Li-ion batteries is insufficient for the long-term needs of society, for example, extended-range electric vehicles. To go beyond the horizon of Li-ion batteries is a formidable challenge; there are few options. Here we consider two: Li-air (O(2)) and Li-S. The energy that can be stored in Li-air (based on aqueous or non-aqueous electrolytes) and Li-S cells is compared with Li-ion; the operation of the cells is discussed, as are the significant hurdles that will have to be overcome if such batteries are to succeed. Fundamental scientific advances in understanding the reactions occurring in the cells as well as new materials are key to overcoming these obstacles. The potential benefits of Li-air and Li-S justify the continued research effort that will be needed.
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        Electrical energy storage for the grid: a battery of choices.

        The increasing interest in energy storage for the grid can be attributed to multiple factors, including the capital costs of managing peak demands, the investments needed for grid reliability, and the integration of renewable energy sources. Although existing energy storage is dominated by pumped hydroelectric, there is the recognition that battery systems can offer a number of high-value opportunities, provided that lower costs can be obtained. The battery systems reviewed here include sodium-sulfur batteries that are commercially available for grid applications, redox-flow batteries that offer low cost, and lithium-ion batteries whose development for commercial electronics and electric vehicles is being applied to grid storage.
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          EXPGUI, a graphical user interface forGSAS

           Brian H Toby (2001)
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0671 5021, GRID grid.255168.d, Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, , Dongguk University-Seoul, ; Seoul, 04620 South Korea
            [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0470 5905, GRID grid.31501.36, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, , Seoul National University, ; Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 South Korea
            [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0486 528X, GRID grid.1007.6, Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, , University of Wollongong, ; Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 Australia
            [4 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0742 4007, GRID grid.49100.3c, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, , POSTECH, ; 77 Cheongam-ro, Nam-gu, Pohang 37673 South Korea
            [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2171 7818, GRID grid.289247.2, Department of Mechanical Engineering, , Kyung Hee University, ; 1732, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 17104 Republic of Korea
            Contributors
            dake1234@dongguk.edu
            Journal
            Nat Commun
            Nat Commun
            Nature Communications
            Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
            2041-1723
            7 January 2019
            7 January 2019
            2019
            : 10
            30617270
            6323141
            7646
            10.1038/s41467-018-07646-4
            © The Author(s) 2019

            Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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