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      The Raw and the Stolen : Cooking and the Ecology of Human Origins

      , , , ,

      Current Anthropology

      University of Chicago Press

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          The Expensive-Tissue Hypothesis: The Brain and the Digestive System in Human and Primate Evolution

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            Body mass in comparative primatology.

            Data are presented on adult body mass for 230 of 249 primate species, based on a review of the literature and previously unpublished data. The issues involved in collecting data on adult body mass are discussed, including the definition of adults, the effects of habitat and pregnancy, the strategy for pooling data on single species from multiple studies, and use of an appropriate number of significant figures. An analysis of variability in body mass indicates that the coefficient of variation for body mass increases with increasing species mean mass. Evaluation of several previous body mass reviews reveals a number of shortcomings with data that have been used often in comparative studies.
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              The dynamics of operational sex ratios and competition for mates.

              In sexually reproducing animals, individuals of one sex may have to compete for access to mating partners of the opposite sex. The operational sex ratio (OSR) is central in predicting the intensity of mating competition and which sex is competing for which. Thanks to recent theoretical and empirical advances, particularly by exploring the concept of OSR, sexual selection studies today are becoming more fine-tuned and dynamic. The original role of parental investment in predicting sexual selection has recently been complemented by the use of sexual differences in potential reproductive rates (PRR).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Anthropology
                Current Anthropology
                University of Chicago Press
                0011-3204
                1537-5382
                December 1999
                December 1999
                : 40
                : 5
                : 567-594
                Article
                10.1086/300083
                f7c50e1b-b5ee-4727-af0b-7ea2217623fd
                © 1999
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