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Effectiveness of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery in a tertiary university hospital

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      Abstract

      BackgroundThe increasing demand on hospitalisation, either due to elective activity from the waiting lists or due to emergency admissions coming from the Emergency Department (ED), requires looking for strategies that lead to effective bed management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a surgery admission unit for major elective surgery patients who were admitted for same-day surgery.MethodsWe included all patients admitted for elective surgery in a university tertiary hospital between the 1st of September and the 31st of December 2006, as well as those admitted during the same period of 2008, after the introduction of the Surgery Admission Unit. The main outcome parameters were global length of stay, pre-surgery length of stay, proportion of patients admitted the same day of the surgery and number of cancellations. Differences between the two periods were evaluated by the T-test and Chi-square test. Significance at P < 0.05 was assumed throughout.ResultsWe included 6,053 patients, 3,003 during 2006 and 3,050 patients during 2008. Global length of stay was 6.2 days (IC 95%:6.4-6) in 2006 and 5.5 days (IC 95%:5.8-5.2) in 2008 (p < 0.005). Pre-surgery length of stay was reduced from 0.46 days (IC 95%:0.44-0.48) in 2006 to 0.29 days (IC 95%:0.27-0.31) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The proportion of patients admitted for same-day surgery was 67% (IC 95%:69%-65%) in 2006 and 76% (IC 95%:78%-74%) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The number of cancelled interventions due to insufficient preparation was 31 patients in 2006 and 7 patients in 2008.ConclusionsThe implementation of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery has proved to be an effective strategy for improving bed management. It has enabled an improvement in the proportion of patients admitted on the same day as surgery and a shorter length of stay.

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      The effect of outpatient preoperative evaluation of hospital inpatients on cancellation of surgery and length of hospital stay.

      To evaluate the possible effects of outpatient preoperative evaluation (OPE) for new surgical patients who will be inpatients, we conducted an observational study at a university hospital in The Netherlands. Various outcomes before and after the introduction of an OPE clinic were compared. The study population comprised all 21,553 elective adult inpatients operated on between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1999. Cardiac surgery, obstetric and pediatric patients, and patients operated on in same-day surgery were excluded. The main outcome measures were surgical cases canceled for medical reasons, rate of same-day admissions (who were expected to increase), and length of hospital stay. After introduction of OPE, the rate of cancellations for medical reasons decreased from 2.0% to 0.9% (adjusted odds ratio 0.7, 95% CI, 0.5--0.9). The rate of same-day admissions increased from 5.3% before to 7.7% after OPE introduction (adjusted odds ratio 1.2, 95% CI, 1.01--1.39), and the total hospital length of stay (in days) significantly decreased by a factor of 0.92 (0.90--0.94), which was partly the result of a reduction in preoperative admission time. We concluded that, although smaller than anticipated, the use of OPE for potential inpatients leads to a significant reduction of cancelled cases and of length of admission. Further increase of these benefits from OPE requires changes in institutional policy, such as forcing surgical departments to increase their number of same-day admissions. An observational study was conducted to compare various outcomes before and after the introduction of outpatient preoperative evaluation (OPE). Although smaller than anticipated, OPE for potential inpatients leads to a significant reduction of canceled cases and of length of admission.
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        Effectiveness and safety of an emergency department short-stay unit as an alternative to standard inpatient hospitalisation.

        Emergency department short-stay units (EDSSUs) are currently emerging worldwide as an alternative to standard inpatient hospitalisation. In our hospital, a 960-bed teaching tertiary institution in Barcelona, Spain, an EDSSU has been in operation during winter periods (November-March) since 1997. To determine the efficacy and safety of our EDSSU. Retrospective analysis of activity and quality outcomes, assessment of patient satisfaction levels and determination of the diagnostic-related groups that were mainly responsible for admissions to the EDSSU, comparing the clinical characteristics of those patients with the characteristics of patients with similar clinical diagnoses admitted to standard hospitalisation units. 5666 patients were treated in the EDSSU, with a progressive increase in the number of patients admitted per period, ranging from 707 in 1997-8 to 1227 in 2003-4 (73.5% increase). The mean length of stay ranged from 3.1 to 2.8 days, mortality from 2.5% to 5.1%, home discharge rate from 84% to 90%, and hospital readmission rate within the first week after discharge from 3.9% to 6.2%. In all, 98% of patients were satisfied with their stay at the EDSSU. The main diagnostic-related groups were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD = 50%) and acute heart failure (28%). Patients with COPD admitted at the EDSSU (n = 545) showed significantly (p = 0.05) lower mean length of stay (3.4 v 12 days) and mortality (1.7% v 8.1%), but a higher hospital readmission rate (9.9% v 7%) than those admitted to standard inpatient units (n = 1961). In our experience, the EDSSU proved to be an effective and safe alternative to standard inpatient hospitalisation.
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          Changing the admission process for elective surgery: an economic analysis.

           B Finegan,  P Boothe (1995)
          This study compared the costs of an inpatient elective surgical admission process with an outpatient based same day admission programme in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The effect of this process change on annual surgical volume and case flow (number of procedures performed per surgical bed) in the year before the initiation of same-day method (1989/90) and subsequent to the widespread use of the process (1992/93), was also assessed. Costs incurred by 53 patients who underwent preoperative anaesthetic and surgical assessment as outpatients and were admitted as an outpatient on the day of surgery (SD Group) were compared with those incurred by 11 patients who entered hospital on the day before surgery and underwent anaesthetic and other assessments as inpatients (IP Group). Nursing, radiology, laboratory, operating room, rehabilitation and clinic costs were obtained for each patient. The remaining costs were not amenable to individual attribution and were assigned to each group as a percentage of the allocated costs. The cost per case in the SD Group was $360 less than in the IP Group, reflecting decreased nursing costs incurred by the SD Group. Between the period 1989/90 and 1992/93, the number of surgical beds declined 15.7%; however, surgical volume decreased by only 5.4%. Total case flow improved by 12.2%, that for elective and non-elective surgery increasing by 14.1% and 9.5%, respectively. Elective surgery, where same day admission was used, showed the greatest improvement in case flow. We conclude that a same day admission process reduces cost and serves to enhance hospital productivity.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Medical Coordinator. Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. IDIBELL. Universitat de Barcelona. Feixa Llarga, s/n.08907. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. Spain
            [2 ]Medical Subdirector. Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. IDIBELL. Universitat de Barcelona. Feixa Llarga, s/n.08907. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. Spain
            [3 ]Medical Director. Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. IDIBELL. Universitat de Barcelona. Feixa Llarga, s/n.08907. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. Spain
            [4 ]Nursing Coordinator. Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. IDIBELL. Universitat de Barcelona. Feixa Llarga, s/n.08907. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. Spain
            [5 ]Chief Executive. Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. IDIBELL. Universitat de Barcelona. Feixa Llarga, s/n.08907. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. Spain
            Contributors
            Journal
            BMC Health Serv Res
            BMC Health Services Research
            BioMed Central
            1472-6963
            2010
            22 January 2010
            : 10
            : 23
            2823739
            1472-6963-10-23
            20096114
            10.1186/1472-6963-10-23
            Copyright ©2010 Ortiga et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Research article

            Health & Social care

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