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      Eradication revisited: dealing with exotic species

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      Trends in Ecology & Evolution

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Invasions of nonindigenous species threaten native biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, animal and plant health, and human economies. The best solution is to prevent the introduction of exotic organisms but, once introduced, eradication might be feasible. The potential ecological and social ramifications of eradication projects make them controversial; however, these programs provide unique opportunities for experimental ecological studies. Deciding whether to attempt eradication is not simple and alternative approaches might be preferable in some situations.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Impending extinctions of North American freshwater mussels (Unionoida) following the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) invasion

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            Population Dynamics of Gypsy Moth in North America

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              Eradication and pest management.

              Eradication is the elimination of every single individual of a species from an area to which recolonization is unlikely to occur. Cost-benefit analyses of eradication programs involve biases that tend to underestimate the costs and overestimate the benefits. In this review, we (a) highlight limitations of current cost-benefit analyses, (b) assess eradication strategies from biological and sociological perspectives by discussing particular cases of successful and failed eradication efforts, and (c) briefly contrast eradication and ongoing area-wide control as pest management strategies. Two successful eradication programs involve the screwworm and cattle ticks. Gypsy moth and medfly eradication programs have not been successful, and subsequent captures of insects recur in eradication areas. In situations where heterogeneity of land use patterns make it difficult to prevent reinvasion of the pest, education and area-wide suppression are probably more realistic goals than eradication.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Trends in Ecology & Evolution
                Trends in Ecology & Evolution
                Elsevier BV
                01695347
                August 2000
                August 2000
                : 15
                : 8
                : 316-320
                Article
                10.1016/S0169-5347(00)01914-5
                10884695
                © 2000

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