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      Knowing Bass: Accounting for Information Environments in Designing Online Public Outreach

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          Abstract

          Social media and online news sites have become common outlets through which publics encounter information that shape their knowledge, values, and opinions about food. This article extends scholarship at the intersections of user experience design and online public outreach by focusing on the role of social media and online news sites in information environments that impact public site users’ knowledge about and practices of seafood production and consumption. First, we introduce an ongoing design project about North Carolina seafood production and consumption to provide an example of how and why site designers should account for how online information affects public understanding. Next, we contextualize the challenges of this project by introducing a conceptual framework that helps to explain why the values and practices of understanding seafood production are so complex. Finally, through this case and framework, we argue that designers of online public outreach projects should become more aware of designing in contexts shaped by social media. The potential for public learning is affected by how people search for, encounter, and discuss information about the issues that matter to their lives. We offer a classroom heuristic for identifying and addressing the role of information environments in rhetoric and/or technical communication courses.

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          Does aquaculture add resilience to the global food system?

          Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector and continues to expand alongside terrestrial crop and livestock production. Using portfolio theory as a conceptual framework, we explore how current interconnections between the aquaculture, crop, livestock, and fisheries sectors act as an impediment to, or an opportunity for, enhanced resilience in the global food system given increased resource scarcity and climate change. Aquaculture can potentially enhance resilience through improved resource use efficiencies and increased diversification of farmed species, locales of production, and feeding strategies. However, aquaculture's reliance on terrestrial crops and wild fish for feeds, its dependence on freshwater and land for culture sites, and its broad array of environmental impacts diminishes its ability to add resilience. Feeds for livestock and farmed fish that are fed rely largely on the same crops, although the fraction destined for aquaculture is presently small (∼4%). As demand for high-value fed aquaculture products grows, competition for these crops will also rise, as will the demand for wild fish as feed inputs. Many of these crops and forage fish are also consumed directly by humans and provide essential nutrition for low-income households. Their rising use in aquafeeds has the potential to increase price levels and volatility, worsening food insecurity among the most vulnerable populations. Although the diversification of global food production systems that includes aquaculture offers promise for enhanced resilience, such promise will not be realized if government policies fail to provide adequate incentives for resource efficiency, equity, and environmental protection.
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            The roles of rhetoric in the public understanding of science

             Alan Gross (1994)
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              Gender, politics, and the theoretical virtues

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2056-6700
                Open Library of Humanities
                Open Library of Humanities
                2056-6700
                18 December 2018
                2018
                : 4
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]NC State University, US
                Article
                10.16995/olh.377
                Copyright: © 2018 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

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                Self URI (journal-page): https://olh.openlibhums.org/
                Categories
                Cultivating spheres: agriculture, technical communication, and the publics

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