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      Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies - ConSEFS.

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          Abstract

          Ethnopharmacological research aims at gathering information on local and traditional uses of plants and other natural substances. However, the approaches used and the methods employed vary, and while such a variability is desirable in terms of scientific diversity, research must adhere to well defined quality standards and reproducible methods OBJECTIVES: With ConSEFS (the Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies) we want to define best-practice in developing, conducting and reporting field studies focusing on local and traditional uses of medicinal and food plants, including studies using a historical approach.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Ethnopharmacol
          Journal of ethnopharmacology
          Elsevier BV
          1872-7573
          0378-8741
          Jan 30 2018
          : 211
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Research Cluster 'Biodiversity and Medicines'/Research Group 'Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy', UCL School of Pharmacy, University in London, 29-39 Brunswick Sq., London WC1N 1AX, UK. Electronic address: m.heinrich@ucl.ac.uk.
          [2 ] Vorhaldenstrasse 8, 8049 Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: andreas.lardos@nilufar.ch.
          [3 ] Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari (CA), Italy. Electronic address: marcoleonti@netscape.net.
          [4 ] Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Zürich, Zollikerstrasse 107, CH-8008 Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: caroline.weckerle@systbot.uzh.ch.
          [5 ] Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, UK. Electronic address: M.L.Willcox@soton.ac.uk.
          [6 ] Research Cluster 'Biodiversity and Medicines'/Research Group 'Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy', UCL School of Pharmacy, University in London, 29-39 Brunswick Sq., London WC1N 1AX, UK.
          [7 ] Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299, USA. Electronic address: applequist@mobot.org.
          [8 ] Laboratorio Ecotono, INIBIOMA, CONICET-Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Argentina. Electronic address: ladioah@comahue-conicet.gob.ar.
          [9 ] College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081, China. Electronic address: long@mail.kib.ac.cn.
          [10 ] School of Natural Product Studies, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India. Electronic address: pulokm@gmail.com.
          [11 ] Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, 7601 Stellenbosch, South Africa. Electronic address: garyistafford@gmail.com.
          Article
          S0378-8741(17)32403-0
          10.1016/j.jep.2017.08.015
          28818646
          f85d9c4d-02ce-4fb4-a51f-9192a4e94e09
          History

          Historical studies,Medicinal plants,Traditional medicine,Consort (adaption),Ethnopharmacological field studies

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