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      From polyploidy to aneuploidy, genome instability and cancer.

      Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology

      Aneuploidy, Animals, Biological Evolution, Genomic Instability, genetics, Humans, Models, Genetic, Neoplasms, Polyploidy

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          Abstract

          Polyploidy is a frequent phenomenon in the eukaryotic world, but the biological properties of polyploid cells are not well understood. During evolution, polyploidy is thought to be an important mechanism that contributes to speciation. Polyploid, usually non-dividing, cells are formed during development in otherwise diploid organisms. A growing amount of evidence indicates that polyploid cells also arise during a variety of pathological conditions. Genetic instability in these cells might provide a route to aneuploidy and thereby contribute to the development of cancer.

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          Most cited references 92

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          Recent segmental duplications in the human genome.

          Primate-specific segmental duplications are considered important in human disease and evolution. The inability to distinguish between allelic and duplication sequence overlap has hampered their characterization as well as assembly and annotation of our genome. We developed a method whereby each public sequence is analyzed at the clone level for overrepresentation within a whole-genome shotgun sequence. This test has the ability to detect duplications larger than 15 kilobases irrespective of copy number, location, or high sequence similarity. We mapped 169 large regions flanked by highly similar duplications. Twenty-four of these hot spots of genomic instability have been associated with genetic disease. Our analysis indicates a highly nonrandom chromosomal and genic distribution of recent segmental duplications, with a likely role in expanding protein diversity.
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            Cell cycle checkpoints: preventing an identity crisis.

             S Elledge (1996)
            Cell cycle checkpoints are regulatory pathways that control the order and timing of cell cycle transitions and ensure that critical events such as DNA replication and chromosome segregation are completed with high fidelity. In addition, checkpoints respond to damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and by inducing transcription of genes that facilitate repair. Checkpoint loss results in genomic instability and has been implicated in the evolution of normal cells into cancer cells. Recent advances have revealed signal transduction pathways that transmit checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage, replication blocks, and spindle damage. Checkpoint pathways have components shared among all eukaryotes, underscoring the conservation of cell cycle regulatory machinery.
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              Understanding mechanisms of novel gene expression in polyploids.

              Polyploidy has long been recognized as a prominent force shaping the evolution of eukaryotes, especially flowering plants. New phenotypes often arise with polyploid formation and can contribute to the success of polyploids in nature or their selection for use in agriculture. Although the causes of novel variation in polyploids are not well understood, they could involve changes in gene expression through increased variation in dosage-regulated gene expression, altered regulatory interactions, and rapid genetic and epigenetic changes. New research approaches are being used to study these mechanisms and the results should provide a more complete understanding of polyploidy.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                14708009
                10.1038/nrm1276

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