Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Normal tension glaucoma-like degeneration of the visual system in aged marmosets

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus) is a non-human primate that provides valuable models for neuroscience and aging research due to its anatomical similarities to humans and relatively short lifespan. This study was carried out to examine whether aged marmosets develop glaucoma, as seen in humans. We found that 11% of the aged marmosets presented with glaucoma-like characteristics; this incident rate is very similar to that in humans. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a significant volume loss in the visual cortex, and histological analyses confirmed the degeneration of the lateral geniculate nuclei and visual cortex in the affected marmosets. These marmosets did not have elevated intraocular pressure, but showed an increased oxidative stress level, low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB expression in the retina, optic nerve head and CSF. Our findings suggest that marmosets have potential to provide useful information for the research of eye and the visual system.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 83

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The number of people with glaucoma worldwide in 2010 and 2020.

           H A Quigley (2006)
          To estimate the number of people with open angle (OAG) and angle closure glaucoma (ACG) in 2010 and 2020. A review of published data with use of prevalence models. Data from population based studies of age specific prevalence of OAG and ACG that satisfied standard definitions were used to construct prevalence models for OAG and ACG by age, sex, and ethnicity, weighting data proportional to sample size of each study. Models were combined with UN world population projections for 2010 and 2020 to derive the estimated number with glaucoma. There will be 60.5 million people with OAG and ACG in 2010, increasing to 79.6 million by 2020, and of these, 74% will have OAG. Women will comprise 55% of OAG, 70% of ACG, and 59% of all glaucoma in 2010. Asians will represent 47% of those with glaucoma and 87% of those with ACG. Bilateral blindness will be present in 4.5 million people with OAG and 3.9 million people with ACG in 2010, rising to 5.9 and 5.3 million people in 2020, respectively. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, disproportionately affecting women and Asians.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Ageing populations: the challenges ahead.

            If the pace of increase in life expectancy in developed countries over the past two centuries continues through the 21st century, most babies born since 2000 in France, Germany, Italy, the UK, the USA, Canada, Japan, and other countries with long life expectancies will celebrate their 100th birthdays. Although trends differ between countries, populations of nearly all such countries are ageing as a result of low fertility, low immigration, and long lives. A key question is: are increases in life expectancy accompanied by a concurrent postponement of functional limitations and disability? The answer is still open, but research suggests that ageing processes are modifiable and that people are living longer without severe disability. This finding, together with technological and medical development and redistribution of work, will be important for our chances to meet the challenges of ageing populations.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Primary open-angle glaucoma.

              Primary open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy and, perhaps, the most common form of glaucoma. Because the disease is treatable, and because the visual impairment caused by glaucoma is irreversible, early detection is essential. Early diagnosis depends on examination of the optic disc, retinal nerve fibre layer, and visual field. New imaging and psychophysical tests can improve both detection and monitoring of the progression of the disease. Recently completed long-term clinical trials provide convincing evidence that lowering intraocular pressure prevents progression at both the early and late stages of the disease. The degree of protection is related to the degree to which intraocular pressure is lowered. Improvements in therapy consist of more effective and better-tolerated drugs to lower intraocular pressure, and more effective surgical procedures. New treatments to directly treat and protect the retinal ganglion cells that are damaged in glaucoma are also in development.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                harada-tk@igakuken.or.jp
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                16 October 2019
                16 October 2019
                2019
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.272456.0, Visual Research Project, , Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, ; Tokyo, Japan
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0376 978X, GRID grid.452212.2, Central Institute for Experimental Animals, ; Kawasaki, Japan
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0661 2073, GRID grid.411898.d, Department of Ophthalmology, , The Jikei University School of Medicine, ; Tokyo, Japan
                [4 ]GRID grid.272456.0, Center for Basic Technology Research, , Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, ; Tokyo, Japan
                [5 ]GRID grid.272456.0, Laboratory of Brain Structure, , Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, ; Tokyo, Japan
                Article
                51281
                10.1038/s41598-019-51281-y
                6795850
                31619716
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100001691, MEXT | Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS);
                Award ID: JP17K11499
                Award ID: JP16K08635
                Award ID: JP17K07123
                Award ID: JP16K07076
                Award ID: JP16K11308
                Award ID: JP15H02360
                Award ID: JP15H04999
                Award ID: JP18K19625
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100009619, Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED);
                Award ID: none
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100008732, Uehara Memorial Foundation;
                Award ID: none
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100007449, Takeda Science Foundation;
                Award ID: none
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Uncategorized

                retinal diseases, experimental models of disease

                Comments

                Comment on this article