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      The antimicrobial resistance monitoring and research (ARMoR) program: the US Department of Defense response to escalating antimicrobial resistance.

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          Abstract

          Responding to escalating antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the US Department of Defense implemented an enterprise-wide collaboration, the Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program, to aid in infection prevention and control. It consists of a network of epidemiologists, bioinformaticists, microbiology researchers, policy makers, hospital-based infection preventionists, and healthcare providers who collaborate to collect relevant AMR data, conduct centralized molecular characterization, and use AMR characterization feedback to implement appropriate infection prevention and control measures and influence policy. A particularly concerning type of AMR, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, significantly declined after the program was launched. Similarly, there have been no further reports or outbreaks of another concerning type of AMR, colistin resistance in Acinetobacter, in the Department of Defense since the program was initiated. However, bacteria containing AMR-encoding genes are increasing. To update program stakeholders and other healthcare systems facing such challenges, we describe the processes and impact of the program.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clin. Infect. Dis.
          Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
          1537-6591
          1058-4838
          Aug 1 2014
          : 59
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Multidrug-Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
          [2 ] Multidrug-Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
          [3 ] Navy and Marine Corps Public Health, EpiData Center Department, Portsmouth, Virginia.
          [4 ] Multidrug-Resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research.
          [5 ] Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas.
          [6 ] Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System, Silver Spring.
          [7 ] Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Falls Church, Virginia.
          [8 ] F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
          Article
          ciu319
          10.1093/cid/ciu319
          24795331
          Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

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