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Impact of untreated dental caries on the daily activities of children : Impact of untreated dental caries

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      Most cited references 25

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      Global burden of untreated caries: a systematic review and metaregression.

      We aimed to consolidate all epidemiologic data about untreated caries and subsequently generate internally consistent prevalence and incidence estimates for all countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes for 1990 and 2010. The systematic search of the literature yielded 18,311 unique citations. After screening titles and abstracts, we excluded 10,461 citations as clearly irrelevant to this systematic review, leaving 1,682 for full-text review. Furthermore, 1,373 publications were excluded following the validity assessment. Overall, 192 studies of 1,502,260 children aged 1 to 14 y in 74 countries and 186 studies of 3,265,546 individuals aged 5 y or older in 67 countries were included in separate metaregressions for untreated caries in deciduous and permanent teeth, respectively, using modeling resources from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study. In 2010, untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition worldwide, affecting 2.4 billion people, and untreated caries in deciduous teeth was the 10th-most prevalent condition, affecting 621 million children worldwide. The global age-standardized prevalence and incidence of untreated caries remained static between 1990 and 2010. There is evidence that the burden of untreated caries is shifting from children to adults, with 3 peaks in prevalence at ages 6, 25, and 70 y. Also, there were considerable variations in prevalence and incidence between regions and countries. Policy makers need to be aware of a predictable increasing burden of untreated caries due to population growth and longevity and a significant decrease in the prevalence of total tooth loss throughout the world from 1990 to 2010.
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        Changes in dental caries 1953-2003.

         T Marthaler (2015)
        In the first half of the 20th century, indices and methods of conducting surveys of the level of dental diseases were developed. Modern epidemiological studies began in the fifties and many reliable studies have been conducted after 1960. In the following decades, a substantial decline of caries prevalence was documented in the majority of the highly industrialized countries, with reductions of lifetime caries experience exceeding 75%. The decline comes to an end when low or very low levels of prevalence are reached. Children of low socioeconomic status and immigrants from outside Western Europe, however, generally have higher disease levels and may cause increases in caries prevalence. For this and other reasons, caries epidemiology will remain an indispensable part of dental public health. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel
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          Changing paradigms in concepts on dental caries: consequences for oral health care.

           O Fejerskov (2015)
          Kuhn proposed in his Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) that the theoretical framework of a science (paradigm) determines how each generation of researchers construes a causal sequence. Paradigm change is infrequent and revolutionary; thereafter previous knowledge and ideas become partially redundant. This paper discusses two paradigms central to cariology. The first concerns the most successful caries-preventive agent: fluoride. When it was thought that fluoride had to be present during tooth mineralisation to 'improve' the biological apatite and the 'caries resistance' of the teeth, systemic fluoride administration was necessary for maximum benefit. Caries reduction therefore had to be balanced against increasing dental fluorosis. The 'caries resistance' concept was shown to be erroneous 25 years ago, but the new paradigm is not yet fully adopted in public health dentistry, so we still await real breakthroughs in more effective use of fluorides for caries prevention. The second paradigm is that caries is a transmittable, infectious disease: even one caused by specific microorganisms. This paradigm would require caries prevention by vaccination, but there is evidence that caries is not a classical infectious disease. Rather it results from an ecological shift in the tooth-surface biofilm, leading to a mineral imbalance between plaque fluid and tooth and hence net loss of tooth mineral. Therefore, caries belongs to common 'complex' or 'multifactorial' diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, in which many genetic, environmental and behavioural risk factors interact. The paper emphasises how these paradigm changes raise new research questions which need to be addressed to make caries prevention and treatment more cost-effective. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas; Piracicaba Brazil
            [2 ]Dental School, University of Minas Gerais; Belo Horizonte Brazil
            [3 ]Department of Dentistry; University of Montes Claros; Montes Claros Brazil
            Journal
            Journal of Public Health Dentistry
            Journal of Public Health Dentistry
            Wiley
            00224006
            June 2018
            June 2018
            November 29 2017
            : 78
            : 3
            : 197-202
            10.1111/jphd.12259
            © 2017

            http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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