Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      COPD phenotypes: differences in survival

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          The aim of the study was to analyze the characteristics and survival of a group of patients with COPD according to their clinical phenotype.

          Patients and methods

          The study population was selected from patients undergoing scheduled spirometry between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011 at the respiratory function laboratory of a teaching hospital and comprised those with a previous and confirmed diagnosis of COPD and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1) of <70%. The patients selected were classified into 4 groups: positive bronchodilator response, non-exacerbator, exacerbator with emphysema, and exacerbator with chronic bronchitis. Patients were followed up until April 2017.

          Results

          We recruited 273 patients, of whom 89% were men. The distribution by phenotype was as follows: non-exacerbator, 47.2%; positive bronchodilator response, 25.8%; exacerbator with chronic bronchitis, 13.8%; and exacerbator with emphysema, 13.0%. A total of 90 patients died during follow-up (32.9%). Taking patients with a positive bronchodilator response as the reference category, the risk factors that were independently associated with death were older age (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03–1.09), lower FEV 1 (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96–0.99), and exacerbator with chronic bronchitis phenotype (HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.53–7.03).

          Conclusion

          Classification of COPD patients by phenotype makes it possible to identify subgroups with different prognoses. Thus, mortality was greater in exacerbators with chronic bronchitis and lower in those with a positive bronchodilator response.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The clinical features of the overlap between COPD and asthma

          Background The coexistence of COPD and asthma is widely recognized but has not been well described. This study characterizes clinical features, spirometry, and chest CT scans of smoking subjects with both COPD and asthma. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study comparing subjects with COPD and asthma to subjects with COPD alone in the COPDGene Study. Results 119 (13%) of 915 subjects with COPD reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These subjects were younger (61.3 vs 64.7 years old, p = 0.0001) with lower lifetime smoking intensity (43.7 vs 55.1 pack years, p = 0.0001). More African-Americans reported a history of asthma (33.6% vs 15.6%, p < 0.0001). Subjects with COPD and asthma demonstrated worse disease-related quality of life, were more likely to have had a severe COPD exacerbation in the past year, and were more likely to experience frequent exacerbations (OR 3.55 [2.19, 5.75], p < 0.0001). Subjects with COPD and asthma demonstrated greater gas-trapping on chest CT. There were no differences in spirometry or CT measurements of emphysema or airway wall thickness. Conclusion Subjects with COPD and asthma represent a relevant clinical population, with worse health-related quality of life. They experience more frequent and severe respiratory exacerbations despite younger age and reduced lifetime smoking history. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00608764
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on physiologic and psychosocial outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

            To compare the effects of comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation with those of education alone on physiologic and psychosocial outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Randomized clinical trial. University medical center. 119 outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that was stable while patients received a standard medical regimen. Patients were randomly assigned to either an 8-week comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program or to an 8-week education program. Pulmonary rehabilitation consisted of twelve 4-hour sessions that included education, physical and respiratory care instruction, psychosocial support, and supervised exercise training. Monthly reinforcement sessions were held for 1 year. The education group attended four 2-hour sessions that included video-tapes, lectures, and discussions but not individual instruction or exercise training. Pulmonary function, maximum exercise tolerance and endurance, gas exchange, symptoms of perceived breathlessness and muscle fatigue with exercise, shortness of breath, self-efficacy for walking, depression, general quality of well-being, and hospitalizations associated with pulmonary diseases. Patients were followed for 6 years. Compared with education alone, comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation produced a significantly greater increase in maximal exercise tolerance (+1.5 metabolic equivalents [METS] compared with +0.6 METS [P < 0.001]; maximal oxygen uptake, +0.11 L/min compared with +0.03 L/min [P = 0.06]), exercise endurance (+10.5 minutes compared with +1.3 minutes [P < 0.001]), symptoms of perceived breathlessness (score of -1.5 compared with +0.2 [P < 0.001]) and muscle fatigue (score of -1.4 compared with -0.2 [P < 0.01]), shortness of breath (score of -7.0 compared with +0.6 [P < 0.01]), and self-efficacy for walking (score of +1.4 compared with +0.1 [P < 0.05]). There were slight but nonsignificant differences in survival (67% compared with 56% [P = 0.32]) and duration of hospital stay (-2.4 days/patient per year compared with +1.3 days/patient per year [P = 0.20]). Measures of lung function, depression, and general quality of life did not differ between groups. Differences tended to diminish after 1 year of follow-up. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation significantly improved exercise performance and symptoms for patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Benefits were partially maintained for at least 1 year and tended to diminish after that time.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Predictors of mortality in patients with emphysema and severe airflow obstruction.

              Limited data exist describing risk factors for mortality in patients having predominantly emphysema. A total of 609 patients with severe emphysema (ages 40-83 yr; 64.2% male) randomized to the medical therapy arm of the National Emphysema Treatment Trial formed the study group. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to investigate risk factors for all-cause mortality. Risk factors examined included demographics, body mass index, physiologic data, quality of life, dyspnea, oxygen utilization, hemoglobin, smoking history, quantitative emphysema markers on computed tomography, and a modification of a recently described multifunctional index (modified BODE). Overall, high mortality was seen in this cohort (12.7 deaths per 100 person-years; 292 total deaths). In multivariate analyses, increasing age (p=0.001), oxygen utilization (p=0.04), lower total lung capacity % predicted (p=0.05), higher residual volume % predicted (p=0.04), lower maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing workload (p=0.002), greater proportion of emphysema in the lower lung zone versus the upper lung zone (p=0.005), and lower upper-to-lower-lung perfusion ratio (p=0.007), and modified BODE (p=0.02) were predictive of mortality. FEV1 was a significant predictor of mortality in univariate analysis (p=0.005), but not in multivariate analysis (p=0.21). Although patients with advanced emphysema experience significant mortality, subgroups based on age, oxygen utilization, physiologic measures, exercise capacity, and emphysema distribution identify those at increased risk of death.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2018
                20 July 2018
                : 13
                : 2245-2251
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Respiratory Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Madrid, Spain
                [2 ]Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain, rodrigo.jimenez@ 123456urjc.es
                [3 ]Respiratory Department, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), Madrid, Spain
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Rodrigo Jiménez-García, Preventive Medicine and Public Health Teaching and Research Unit, Health Sciences Faculty, Rey Juan Carlos University, Avda Atenas sn., Alcorcón, 28922 Madrid, Spain, Tel +34 91 488 88 53, Email rodrigo.jimenez@ 123456urjc.es
                Article
                copd-13-2245
                10.2147/COPD.S166163
                6055897
                © 2018 Hernández Vázquez et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article