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      Changes in bee community structure (Hymenoptera, Apoidea) under three different land-use conditions

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      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Bee communities were studied with three different conditions of land-use: 1) urban area; 2) crops and livestock; and, 3) preserved vegetation. All three conditions have elements of tropical dry forest and are in the "Sierra de Quila" Flora and Fauna Protection Area and its influence zone. Sampling was carried out throughout the year (three days per month) for each land-use condition. Bee species and their abundance were registered with the intention of knowing how changes in the vegetation are related to bee community structure (richness, abundance, and α and β diversity).

          A total of 14,054 individuals from 160 species were registered. A rarefaction analysis, showed that the preserved areas had significantly greater richness and diversity. Beta diversity analysis revealed a species turnover of nearly 32% among each pair of conditions. It is concluded that the changes in land-use negatively affect richness and diversity and causes major changes in species composition of the bee community. For this reason, it is recommended that the protection of the tropical dry forest, both for this study area but also in general for Mexico, is essential to guarantee the conservation of this group of insects, which are required for the reproduction of a great number wild and cultivated plant specie.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Landscape effects on crop pollination services: are there general patterns?

          Pollination by bees and other animals increases the size, quality, or stability of harvests for 70% of leading global crops. Because native species pollinate many of these crops effectively, conserving habitats for wild pollinators within agricultural landscapes can help maintain pollination services. Using hierarchical Bayesian techniques, we synthesize the results of 23 studies - representing 16 crops on five continents - to estimate the general relationship between pollination services and distance from natural or semi-natural habitats. We find strong exponential declines in both pollinator richness and native visitation rate. Visitation rate declines more steeply, dropping to half of its maximum at 0.6 km from natural habitat, compared to 1.5 km for richness. Evidence of general decline in fruit and seed set - variables that directly affect yields - is less clear. Visitation rate drops more steeply in tropical compared with temperate regions, and slightly more steeply for social compared with solitary bees. Tropical crops pollinated primarily by social bees may therefore be most susceptible to pollination failure from habitat loss. Quantifying these general relationships can help predict consequences of land use change on pollinator communities and crop productivity, and can inform landscape conservation efforts that balance the needs of native species and people.
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            A meta-analysis of bees' responses to anthropogenic disturbance

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              LINKING BEES AND FLOWERS: HOW DO FLORAL COMMUNITIES STRUCTURE POLLINATOR COMMUNITIES?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                October 31 2018
                October 31 2018
                : 66
                : 23-38
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.66.27367
                © 2018

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