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      Evolutionary ecology of inducible morphological plasticity in predator–prey interaction: toward the practical links with population ecology

      , , ,
      Population Ecology
      Springer Nature

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          Phenotypic plasticity in the interactions and evolution of species.

          When individuals of two species interact, they can adjust their phenotypes in response to their respective partner, be they antagonists or mutualists. The reciprocal phenotypic change between individuals of interacting species can reflect an evolutionary response to spatial and temporal variation in species interactions and ecologically result in the structuring of food chains. The evolution of adaptive phenotypic plasticity has led to the success of organisms in novel habitats, and potentially contributes to genetic differentiation and speciation. Taken together, phenotypic responses in species interactions represent modifications that can lead to reciprocal change in ecological time, altered community patterns, and expanded evolutionary potential of species.
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            Trophic cascades: the primacy of trait-mediated indirect interactions

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              Ecological consequences of phenotypic plasticity.

              Phenotypic plasticity is widespread in nature, and often involves ecologically relevant behavioral, physiological, morphological and life-historical traits. As a result, plasticity alters numerous interactions between organisms and their abiotic and biotic environments. Although much work on plasticity has focused on its patterns of expression and evolution, researchers are increasingly interested in understanding how plasticity can affect ecological patterns and processes at various levels. Here, we highlight an expanding body of work that examines how plasticity can affect all levels of ecological organization through effects on demographic parameters, direct and indirect species interactions, such as competition, predation, and coexistence, and ultimately carbon and nutrient cycles.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Population Ecology
                Popul Ecol
                Springer Nature
                1438-3896
                1438-390X
                January 2010
                November 2009
                : 52
                : 1
                : 37-46
                Article
                10.1007/s10144-009-0182-0
                fa0dbe51-928c-4f9d-b273-28c19c2b12e9
                © 2010
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10144-009-0182-0

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