Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Grasping Ideas with the Motor System: Semantic Somatotopy in Idiom Comprehension

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Single words and sentences referring to bodily actions activate the motor cortex. However, this semantic grounding of concrete language does not address the critical question whether the sensory–motor system contributes to the processing of abstract meaning and thought. We examined functional magnetic resonance imaging activation to idioms and literal sentences including arm- and leg-related action words. A common left fronto-temporal network was engaged in sentence reading, with idioms yielding relatively stronger activity in (pre)frontal and middle temporal cortex. Crucially, somatotopic activation along the motor strip, in central and precentral cortex, was elicited by idiomatic and literal sentences, reflecting the body part reference of the words embedded in the sentences. Semantic somatotopy was most pronounced after sentence ending, thus reflecting sentence-level processing rather than that of single words. These results indicate that semantic representations grounded in the sensory–motor system play a role in the composition of sentence-level meaning, even in the case of idioms.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 75

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Fast robust automated brain extraction.

       Teri S Krebs (2002)
      An automated method for segmenting magnetic resonance head images into brain and non-brain has been developed. It is very robust and accurate and has been tested on thousands of data sets from a wide variety of scanners and taken with a wide variety of MR sequences. The method, Brain Extraction Tool (BET), uses a deformable model that evolves to fit the brain's surface by the application of a set of locally adaptive model forces. The method is very fast and requires no preregistration or other pre-processing before being applied. We describe the new method and give examples of results and the results of extensive quantitative testing against "gold-standard" hand segmentations, and two other popular automated methods. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Thresholding of statistical maps in functional neuroimaging using the false discovery rate.

        Finding objective and effective thresholds for voxelwise statistics derived from neuroimaging data has been a long-standing problem. With at least one test performed for every voxel in an image, some correction of the thresholds is needed to control the error rates, but standard procedures for multiple hypothesis testing (e.g., Bonferroni) tend to not be sensitive enough to be useful in this context. This paper introduces to the neuroscience literature statistical procedures for controlling the false discovery rate (FDR). Recent theoretical work in statistics suggests that FDR-controlling procedures will be effective for the analysis of neuroimaging data. These procedures operate simultaneously on all voxelwise test statistics to determine which tests should be considered statistically significant. The innovation of the procedures is that they control the expected proportion of the rejected hypotheses that are falsely rejected. We demonstrate this approach using both simulations and functional magnetic resonance imaging data from two simple experiments. (C)2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Grounded cognition.

          Grounded cognition rejects traditional views that cognition is computation on amodal symbols in a modular system, independent of the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and introspection. Instead, grounded cognition proposes that modal simulations, bodily states, and situated action underlie cognition. Accumulating behavioral and neural evidence supporting this view is reviewed from research on perception, memory, knowledge, language, thought, social cognition, and development. Theories of grounded cognition are also reviewed, as are origins of the area and common misperceptions of it. Theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues are raised whose future treatment is likely to affect the growth and impact of grounded cognition.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK
            Author notes
            Address correspondence to Véronique Boulenger, PhD, Laboratoire Dynamique du Langage—UMR CNRS 5596, Institut des Sciences de l'Homme, 14 avenue Berthelot, 69363 Lyon Cedex 07, France. Email: Veronique.Boulenger@ 123456ish-lyon.cnrs.fr .
            Journal
            Cereb Cortex
            cercor
            cercor
            Cerebral Cortex (New York, NY)
            Oxford University Press
            1047-3211
            1460-2199
            August 2009
            9 December 2008
            9 December 2008
            : 19
            : 8
            : 1905-1914
            2705699
            19068489
            10.1093/cercor/bhn217
            Published by Oxford University Press 2008.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Articles

            Neurology

            action words, semantic somatotopy, idioms, motor cortex, fmri

            Comments

            Comment on this article