Blog
About

92
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Safety and anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin: a component of tumeric (Curcuma longa).

      Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.)

      Plant Structures, Phytotherapy, Humans, methods, Homeopathy, pharmacology, adverse effects, Curcumin, Antineoplastic Agents, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Tumeric is a spice that comes from the root Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family, Zingaberaceae. In Ayurveda (Indian traditional medicine), tumeric has been used for its medicinal properties for various indications and through different routes of administration, including topically, orally, and by inhalation. Curcuminoids are components of tumeric, which include mainly curcumin (diferuloyl methane), demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcmin. The goal of this systematic review of the literature was to summarize the literature on the safety and anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin. A search of the computerized database MEDLINE (1966 to January 2002), a manual search of bibliographies of papers identified through MEDLINE, and an Internet search using multiple search engines for references on this topic was conducted. The PDR for Herbal Medicines, and four textbooks on herbal medicine and their bibliographies were also searched. A large number of studies on curcumin were identified. These included studies on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antifungal properties of curcuminoids. Studies on the toxicity and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin have included in vitro, animal, and human studies. A phase 1 human trial with 25 subjects using up to 8000 mg of curcumin per day for 3 months found no toxicity from curcumin. Five other human trials using 1125-2500 mg of curcumin per day have also found it to be safe. These human studies have found some evidence of anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin. The laboratory studies have identified a number of different molecules involved in inflammation that are inhibited by curcumin including phospholipase, lipooxygenase, cyclooxygenase 2, leukotrienes, thromboxane, prostaglandins, nitric oxide, collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interferon-inducible protein, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Curcumin has been demonstrated to be safe in six human trials and has demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. It may exert its anti-inflammatory activity by inhibition of a number of different molecules that play a role in inflammation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 22

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Pharmacology of diferuloyl methane (curcumin), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent.

           R Srimal,  B Dhawan (1973)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Specific inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression by dietary curcumin in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

            Curcumin, a major yellow pigment and active component of turmeric, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 plays an important role in colon carcinogenesis. To investigate the effect of curcumin on COX-2 expression, we treated HT-29 human colon cancer cells with various concentrations of curcumin. Curcumin inhibited the cell growth of HT-29 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of COX-2, but not COX-1. These data suggest that a non-toxic concentration of curcumin has a significant effect on the in vitro growth of HT-29 cells, specifically inhibits COX-2 expression, and may have value as a safe chemopreventive agent for colon cancer.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Ferula asa-foetida and Curcuma longa in traditional medical treatment and diet in Nepal.

               D Eigner,  D Scholz (1999)
              Food and eating have powerful symbolic value among the hinduistically-influenced ethnic groups of Nepal. In addition, food plays a major role in the concepts of illness and curing and constitute an integral part of traditional medical prescriptions. Materials that are consumed in 0.5-1.5 g amounts in the daily diet (e.g. the spices turmeric and asafoetida) are used in minute amounts for medical purposes. Why? Three hypotheses are offered here to discuss this issue.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1089/107555303321223035
                12676044

                Comments

                Comment on this article