Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Placental hormone profiles as predictors of preterm birth in twin pregnancy: A prospective cohort study

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          The objective of the study was to analyse placental hormone profiles in twin pregnancies to determine if they could be used to predict preterm birth.

          Study design

          Progesterone, estradiol, estriol and corticotropin-releasing hormone were measured using competitive immunoassay and radioimmunoassay in serum and saliva samples of 98 women with twin pregnancies,at 3 or more gestational timepoints. Hormone profiles throughout gestation were compared between very preterm (<34 weeks; n = 8), preterm (<37 weeks; n = 40) and term (37+ weeks; n = 50) deliveries.

          Results

          No significant differences were found between preterm and term deliveries in either absolute hormone concentrations or ratios. Estimated hormone concentrations and ratios at 26 weeks did not appear to predict preterm delivery. Salivary and serum hormone concentrations were generally poorly correlated.

          Conclusion

          Our results suggest that serial progesterone, estradiol, estriol and corticotropin-releasing hormone measurements in saliva and serum are not robust biomarkers for preterm birth in twin pregnancies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 13

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemiology and causes of preterm birth

          Summary This paper is the first in a three-part series on preterm birth, which is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Infants are born preterm at less than 37 weeks' gestational age after: (1) spontaneous labour with intact membranes, (2) preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM), and (3) labour induction or caesarean delivery for maternal or fetal indications. The frequency of preterm births is about 12–13% in the USA and 5–9% in many other developed countries; however, the rate of preterm birth has increased in many locations, predominantly because of increasing indicated preterm births and preterm delivery of artificially conceived multiple pregnancies. Common reasons for indicated preterm births include pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Births that follow spontaneous preterm labour and PPROM—together called spontaneous preterm births—are regarded as a syndrome resulting from multiple causes, including infection or inflammation, vascular disease, and uterine overdistension. Risk factors for spontaneous preterm births include a previous preterm birth, black race, periodontal disease, and low maternal body-mass index. A short cervical length and a raised cervical-vaginal fetal fibronectin concentration are the strongest predictors of spontaneous preterm birth.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            An overview of mortality and sequelae of preterm birth from infancy to adulthood.

            Survival rates have greatly improved in recent years for infants of borderline viability; however, these infants remain at risk of developing a wide array of complications, not only in the neonatal unit, but also in the long term. Morbidity is inversely related to gestational age; however, there is no gestational age, including term, that is wholly exempt. Neurodevelopmental disabilities and recurrent health problems take a toll in early childhood. Subsequently hidden disabilities such as school difficulties and behavioural problems become apparent and persist into adolescence. Reassuringly, however, most children born very preterm adjust remarkably well during their transition into adulthood. Because mortality rates have fallen, the focus for perinatal interventions is to develop strategies to reduce long-term morbidity, especially the prevention of brain injury and abnormal brain development. In addition, follow-up to middle age and beyond is warranted to identify the risks, especially for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders that are likely to be experienced by preterm survivors.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Saliva specimen: a new laboratory tool for diagnostic and basic investigation.

              The assay of saliva is an increasing area of research with implications for basic and clinical purposes. Although this biological fluid is easy to manipulate and collect, careful attention must be directed to limit variation in specimen integrity. Recently, the use of saliva has provided a substantial addition to the diagnostic armamentarium as an investigative tool for disease processes and disorders. In addition to its oral indications, the analysis of saliva provides important information about the functioning of various organs within the body. In this respect, endocrine research certainly occupies a central role. The present review considers the laboratory aspects of salivary assays with respect to the different analytes including ions, drugs and various non-protein/protein compounds such as hormones and immunoglobulins. This review also examines the consequences of preanalytical variation with respect to collection strategy and subsequent storage conditions. It is likely that the use of saliva in assays will continue to expand thus providing a new instrument of investigation for physiologic as well as pathophysiologic states.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                9 March 2017
                2017
                : 12
                : 3
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Tommy’s Centre for Maternal and Fetal Health, MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, University of Edinburgh Queen’s Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
                [2 ]Mothers and Babies Research Centre, Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
                [3 ]School of Women's and Infants' Health, The University of Western Australia at King Edward Memorial Hospital, Crawley Western Australia, Australia
                Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: JEN and SJS report grant funding to prevent preterm birth in women with twin pregnancy (STOPPIT 2). This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials.

                • Conceptualization: SJS JEN RS.

                • Data curation: AD.

                • Formal analysis: SJS HL.

                • Funding acquisition: SJS.

                • Investigation: SP HCM AD AFH MEB SJS.

                • Methodology: SJS JEN RS MEB AFH.

                • Project administration: SJS JEN.

                • Resources: RS MEB AFH.

                • Supervision: SJS JEN.

                • Writing – original draft: HL SJS.

                • Writing – review & editing: HL SP HCM AFH AD MEB RS JEN SJS.

                Article
                PONE-D-16-41603
                10.1371/journal.pone.0173732
                5344513
                28278220
                © 2017 Lim et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Counts
                Figures: 2, Tables: 5, Pages: 13
                Product
                Funding
                Funded by: University of Edinburgh Albert McKern Bequest
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000306, Tommy's Baby Charity;
                Award Recipient :
                The research was funded by the Albert McKern Bequest, administered by the University of Edinburgh, and Tommy’s Baby Charity. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Maternal Health
                Birth
                Preterm Birth
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Birth
                Preterm Birth
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Maternal Health
                Pregnancy
                Pregnancy Complications
                Preterm Birth
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Pregnancy
                Pregnancy Complications
                Preterm Birth
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Maternal Health
                Pregnancy
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Pregnancy
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Developmental Biology
                Twins
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Anatomy
                Body Fluids
                Saliva
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Anatomy
                Body Fluids
                Saliva
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Physiology
                Body Fluids
                Saliva
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Physiology
                Body Fluids
                Saliva
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Maternal Health
                Birth
                Labor and Delivery
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Women's Health
                Obstetrics and Gynecology
                Birth
                Labor and Delivery
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Biochemistry
                Hormones
                Lipid Hormones
                Progesterone
                Physical Sciences
                Chemistry
                Chemical Compounds
                Organic Compounds
                Steroids
                Physical Sciences
                Chemistry
                Organic Chemistry
                Organic Compounds
                Steroids
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Biochemistry
                Hormones
                Sex Hormones
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article