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      Progress report in Political ecology II: Conjunctures, crises, and critical publics

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      Progress in Human Geography
      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Political ecologists focus on power relations across scales to develop assessments of systems that produce and maintain crises, such as the overlapping conjunctural crises of the coronavirus pandemic and climate breakdown. Such analyses clarify processual and interconnecting factors, exposing the contours of uneven differentiations and coproductions, while offering possible alternative futures. This report engages recent scholarship wherein conjunctural analysis raises issues for how we understand socionatural processes and outcomes, lessons learned, and the exigencies of critical publics in academia and beyond.

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          Most cited references74

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          The 2020 report of The Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: responding to converging crises

          For the Chinese, French, German, and Spanish translations of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.
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            Necropolitics

            A. Mbembe (2003)
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              Zoonotic host diversity increases in human-dominated ecosystems

              Land use change-for example, the conversion of natural habitats to agricultural or urban ecosystems-is widely recognized to influence the risk and emergence of zoonotic disease in humans1,2. However, whether such changes in risk are underpinned by predictable ecological changes remains unclear. It has been suggested that habitat disturbance might cause predictable changes in the local diversity and taxonomic composition of potential reservoir hosts, owing to systematic, trait-mediated differences in species resilience to human pressures3,4. Here we analyse 6,801 ecological assemblages and 376 host species worldwide, controlling for research effort, and show that land use has global and systematic effects on local zoonotic host communities. Known wildlife hosts of human-shared pathogens and parasites overall comprise a greater proportion of local species richness (18-72% higher) and total abundance (21-144% higher) in sites under substantial human use (secondary, agricultural and urban ecosystems) compared with nearby undisturbed habitats. The magnitude of this effect varies taxonomically and is strongest for rodent, bat and passerine bird zoonotic host species, which may be one factor that underpins the global importance of these taxa as zoonotic reservoirs. We further show that mammal species that harbour more pathogens overall (either human-shared or non-human-shared) are more likely to occur in human-managed ecosystems, suggesting that these trends may be mediated by ecological or life-history traits that influence both host status and tolerance to human disturbance5,6. Our results suggest that global changes in the mode and the intensity of land use are creating expanding hazardous interfaces between people, livestock and wildlife reservoirs of zoonotic disease.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Progress in Human Geography
                Progress in Human Geography
                SAGE Publications
                0309-1325
                1477-0288
                July 09 2021
                : 030913252110286
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Syracuse University, USA
                Article
                10.1177/03091325211028665
                fab6a200-1f67-4318-b246-3fdea2e19b81
                © 2021

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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