5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Natural history museums as repositories of endangered diversity: the case of the United States Unionida in the Museo di Zoologia dell’Università di Bologna

      , , ,

      Zoosystematics and Evolution

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The importance of natural history museums is often underappreciated, but they provide society with a number of services. Among these, they are a fundamental tool for assessing extinction rates and range contractions, or the only way to access species extinct in historical times. In this perspective, we describe here the collection of Unionida of the Museo di Zoologia dell’Università di Bologna, containing one extinct (Epioblasma haysiana) and nine threatened species, plus another 47 species. The collection was built in the mid-19th century and potentially provides baseline information for specialists. In the fragmented natural history museum system of Italy, this might be just the tip of the iceberg of a significant and important amount of material collected in the 19th and early-20th century.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 7

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Natural history collections as sources of long-term datasets.

           Adrian Lister,   (2011)
          In the otherwise excellent special issue of Trends in Ecology and Evolution on long-term ecological research (TREE 25(10), 2010), none of the contributors mentioned the importance of natural history collections (NHCs) as sources of data that can strongly complement past and ongoing survey data. Whereas very few field surveys have operated for more than a few decades, NHCs, conserved in museums and other institutions, comprise samples of the Earth's biota typically extending back well into the nineteenth century and, in some cases, before this time. They therefore span the period of accelerated anthropogenic habitat destruction, climate warming and ocean acidification, in many cases reflecting baseline conditions before the major impact of these factors.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Global diversity of freshwater mussels (Mollusca, Bivalvia) in freshwater

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The Value of Natural History Collections

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Zoosystematics and Evolution
                ZSE
                Pensoft Publishers
                1860-0743
                1435-1935
                October 01 2014
                October 01 2014
                : 90
                : 2
                : 105-111
                Article
                10.3897/zse.90.8231
                © 2014
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article