0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Homotypic protection against influenza in a pediatric cohort in Managua, Nicaragua

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The period of protection from repeat infection following symptomatic influenza is not well established due to limited availability of longitudinal data. Using data from a pediatric cohort in Managua, Nicaragua, we examine the effects of natural influenza virus infection on subsequent infection with the same influenza virus subtype/lineage across multiple seasons, totaling 2,170 RT-PCR-confirmed symptomatic influenza infections. Logistic regression models assessed whether infection in the prior influenza season protected against homologous reinfection. We sequenced viruses from 2011–2019 identifying dominant clades and measuring antigenic distances between hemagglutinin clades. We observe homotypic protection from repeat infection in children infected with influenza A/H1N1pdm (OR 0.12, CI 0.02–0.88), A/H3N2 (OR 0.41, CI 0.24–0.73), and B/Victoria (OR 0.00, CI 0.00–0.14), but not with B/Yamagata viruses (OR 0.60, CI 0.09–2.10). Overall, protection wanes as time or antigenic distance increases. Individuals infected with one subtype or lineage of influenza virus have significantly lower odds of homologous reinfection for the following one to two years; after two years this protection wanes. This protection is demonstrated across multiple seasons, subtypes, and lineages among children.

          Abstract

          Here Wraith et al. report homotypic protection from repeated influenza infection in a prospective pediatric cohort in Nicaragua followed for 9 years. This protection is observed across multiple seasons, subtypes, and lineages and is consistent for older and younger children.

          Related collections

          Most cited references44

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          MAFFT Multiple Sequence Alignment Software Version 7: Improvements in Performance and Usability

          We report a major update of the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program. This version has several new features, including options for adding unaligned sequences into an existing alignment, adjustment of direction in nucleotide alignment, constrained alignment and parallel processing, which were implemented after the previous major update. This report shows actual examples to explain how these features work, alone and in combination. Some examples incorrectly aligned by MAFFT are also shown to clarify its limitations. We discuss how to avoid misalignments, and our ongoing efforts to overcome such limitations.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            IQ-TREE: A Fast and Effective Stochastic Algorithm for Estimating Maximum-Likelihood Phylogenies

            Large phylogenomics data sets require fast tree inference methods, especially for maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenies. Fast programs exist, but due to inherent heuristics to find optimal trees, it is not clear whether the best tree is found. Thus, there is need for additional approaches that employ different search strategies to find ML trees and that are at the same time as fast as currently available ML programs. We show that a combination of hill-climbing approaches and a stochastic perturbation method can be time-efficiently implemented. If we allow the same CPU time as RAxML and PhyML, then our software IQ-TREE found higher likelihoods between 62.2% and 87.1% of the studied alignments, thus efficiently exploring the tree-space. If we use the IQ-TREE stopping rule, RAxML and PhyML are faster in 75.7% and 47.1% of the DNA alignments and 42.2% and 100% of the protein alignments, respectively. However, the range of obtaining higher likelihoods with IQ-TREE improves to 73.3-97.1%.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Estimates of global seasonal influenza-associated respiratory mortality: a modelling study

              Estimates of influenza-associated mortality are important for national and international decision making on public health priorities. Previous estimates of 250 000-500 000 annual influenza deaths are outdated. We updated the estimated number of global annual influenza-associated respiratory deaths using country-specific influenza-associated excess respiratory mortality estimates from 1999-2015.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                gordonal@umich.edu
                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2041-1723
                4 March 2022
                4 March 2022
                2022
                : 13
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.214458.e, ISNI 0000000086837370, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, , University of Michigan, ; Ann Arbor, MI USA
                [2 ]Sustainable Sciences Institute, Managua, Nicaragua
                [3 ]Laboratorio Nacional de Virología, Centro Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia, Ministry of Health, Managua, Nicaragua
                [4 ]GRID grid.47840.3f, ISNI 0000 0001 2181 7878, Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, , University of California, Berkeley, ; Berkeley, CA USA
                [5 ]Centro de Salud Sócrates Flores Vivas, Ministry of Health, Managua, Nicaragua
                [6 ]GRID grid.270240.3, ISNI 0000 0001 2180 1622, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, , Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, ; Seattle, WA USA
                [7 ]GRID grid.240871.8, ISNI 0000 0001 0224 711X, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, ; Memphis, TN USA
                [8 ]GRID grid.94365.3d, ISNI 0000 0001 2297 5165, National Institutes of Health, ; Bethesda, MD USA
                Article
                28858
                10.1038/s41467-022-28858-9
                8897407
                35246548
                fadcd758-e080-4c1a-ae07-d14539556982
                © The Author(s) 2022

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100000060, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID);
                Award ID: HHSN272201400006C
                Award ID: U01 AI088654
                Award ID: R01 AI149747-01
                Award ID: U01 AI44616
                Award ID: U01 AI088654
                Award ID: HHSN272201400006C
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
                Funded by: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
                Funded by: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
                Funded by: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
                Funded by: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2022

                Uncategorized
                influenza virus,viral infection,epidemiology
                Uncategorized
                influenza virus, viral infection, epidemiology

                Comments

                Comment on this article