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      The hPLIC Proteins May Provide a Link between the Ubiquitination Machinery and the Proteasome

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          Abstract

          Although there is a binding site on the proteasome for the polyubiquitin chains attached to degradation substrates by the ubiquitination machinery, it is currently unclear whether in vivo the activities of the ubiquitination machinery and the proteasome are coupled. Here we show that two human homologs of the yeast ubiquitin-like Dsk2 protein, hPLIC-1 and hPLIC-2, physically associate with both proteasomes and ubiquitin ligases in large complexes. Overexpression of hPLIC proteins interferes with the in vivo degradation of two unrelated ubiquitin-dependent proteasome substrates, p53 and IkappaBalpha, but not a ubiquitin-independent substrate. Our findings raise the possibility that the hPLIC proteins, and possibly related ubiquitin-like family members, may functionally link the ubiquitination machinery to the proteasome to affect in vivo protein degradation.

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          Most cited references 29

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          The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway: on protein death and cell life.

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            The proteasome: paradigm of a self-compartmentalizing protease.

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              Identification of the receptor component of the IkappaBalpha-ubiquitin ligase.

              NF-kappaB, a ubiquitous, inducible transcription factor involved in immune, inflammatory, stress and developmental processes, is retained in a latent form in the cytoplasm of non-stimulated cells by inhibitory molecules, IkappaBs. Its activation is a paradigm for a signal-transduction cascade that integrates an inducible kinase and the ubiquitin-proteasome system to eliminate inhibitory regulators. Here we isolate the pIkappaBalpha-ubiquitin ligase (pIkappaBalpha-E3) that attaches ubiquitin, a small protein which marks other proteins for degradation by the proteasome system, to the phosphorylated NF-kappaB inhibitor pIkappaBalpha. Taking advantage of its high affinity to pIkappaBalpha, we isolate this ligase from HeLa cells by single-step immunoaffinity purification. Using nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry, we identify the specific component of the ligase that recognizes the pIkappaBalpha degradation motif as an F-box/WD-domain protein belonging to a recently distinguished family of beta-TrCP/Slimb proteins. This component, which we denote E3RSIkappaB (pIkappaBalpha-E3 receptor subunit), binds specifically to pIkappaBalpha and promotes its in vitro ubiquitination in the presence of two other ubiquitin-system enzymes, E1 and UBC5C, one of many known E2 enzymes. An F-box-deletion mutant of E3RS(IkappaB), which tightly binds pIkappaBalpha but does not support its ubiquitination, acts in vivo as a dominant-negative molecule, inhibiting the degradation of pIkappaBalpha and consequently NF-kappaB activation. E3RS(IkappaB) represents a family of receptor proteins that are core components of a class of ubiquitin ligases. When these receptor components recognize their specific ligand, which is a conserved, phosphorylation-based sequence motif, they target regulatory proteins containing this motif for proteasomal degradation.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Cell
                Molecular Cell
                Elsevier BV
                10972765
                August 2000
                August 2000
                : 6
                : 2
                : 409-419
                Article
                10.1016/S1097-2765(00)00040-X
                10983987
                © 2000

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