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      Outdoor thermal comfort for pedestrians in movement: thermal walks in complex urban morphology.

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          Abstract

          In the discussion of designing for a healthier city, people in movement between interconnected spaces perform a non-sedentary activity enhancing sustainability and well-being. However, adverse weather conditions may create uncomfortable thermal sensations that change or ruin the experience of people walking outdoors. This paper is presenting the findings of a 3-year study on the perceptual variation of thermo-spatial conditions and comfort state for pedestrians moving between interconnected spaces. Thermal walks were organised in two European pedestrian routes of 500-m length. The structured walks were conducted with simultaneous microclimatic monitoring and field surveys of thermal perception based on 314 questionnaires, with a focus on the variation of comfort states. The findings suggest that spaces in sequence do not affect significantly microclimatic variation but have a large impact on the dynamic thermal perception of pedestrians. Interconnected spaces of high density result in a differentiation of thermal pleasantness between streets and squares. The aspect of movement along with complexity in urban morphology along a sequence enhances diversity in thermal sensation. This understanding opens possibilities in developing a multisensory-centred urbanism, where the experience of the thermal environment plays an integral role for perception-driven and healthier urban design.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Int J Biometeorol
          International journal of biometeorology
          Springer Science and Business Media LLC
          1432-1254
          0020-7128
          Feb 2020
          : 64
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Urban Living Research Group, School of Architecture, University of Reading, Reading, UK. K.Vasilikou@reading.ac.uk.
          [2 ] The Old Library Building, School of Architecture, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, RG1 5AQ, UK. K.Vasilikou@reading.ac.uk.
          [3 ] Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment, Kent School of Architecture, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, UK.
          [4 ] Marlowe Building, School of Architecture & Planning, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR, UK.
          Article
          10.1007/s00484-019-01782-2
          10.1007/s00484-019-01782-2
          31515611
          fbbc7285-87d3-4283-b252-4af5159eb7ab
          History

          Environmental diversity,Healthier urbanism,Pedestrian movement,Sensory urbanism,Spatial sequences,Thermal perception,Urban morphology

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