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      Self-organization, embodiment, and biologically inspired robotics.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Animals, Biology, Bionics, Equipment Design, Humans, Locomotion, Models, Neurological, Robotics, instrumentation, trends, Systems Biology

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          Abstract

          Robotics researchers increasingly agree that ideas from biology and self-organization can strongly benefit the design of autonomous robots. Biological organisms have evolved to perform and survive in a world characterized by rapid changes, high uncertainty, indefinite richness, and limited availability of information. Industrial robots, in contrast, operate in highly controlled environments with no or very little uncertainty. Although many challenges remain, concepts from biologically inspired (bio-inspired) robotics will eventually enable researchers to engineer machines for the real world that possess at least some of the desirable properties of biological organisms, such as adaptivity, robustness, versatility, and agility.

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          Journal
          18006736
          10.1126/science.1145803

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