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      Importance of Evaluating Dynamic Encapsulation Stability of Amphiphilic Assemblies in Serum

      1 , 1

      Biomacromolecules

      American Chemical Society (ACS)

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">In targeted drug delivery systems, it is desirable that the delivery of hydrophobic drugs to a cell or tissue is achieved with little to no side effects. To ensure that the drugs do not leak during circulation, encapsulation stability of the drug carrier in serum is critical. In this paper, we report on a modified FRET-based method to evaluate encapsulation stability of amphiphilic assemblies and cross-linked polymer assemblies in serum. Our results show that serum components can act as reservoirs for hydrophobic molecules. We also show that serum albumin is likely to be the primary determinant of this property. This work highlights the importance of assessing encapsulation stability in terms of dynamics of guest molecules, as it provides the critical distinction between hydrophobic molecules bound inside amphiphilic assemblies and the molecules that are bound to the hydrophobic pockets of serum albumin. </p><p id="P2"> <div class="figure-container so-text-align-c"> <img alt="" class="figure" src="/document_file/640980dd-b62f-481f-8a04-939941c50db5/PubMedCentral/image/nihms920696u1.jpg"/> </div> </p>

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biomacromolecules
          Biomacromolecules
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          1525-7797
          1526-4602
          November 22 2017
          December 11 2017
          November 14 2017
          December 11 2017
          : 18
          : 12
          : 4163-4170
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Chemistry, ‡Center for Bioactive Delivery, Institute for Applied Life Sciences, and §Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States
          Article
          10.1021/acs.biomac.7b01220
          5725245
          29086559
          © 2017
          Product

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