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      The Psychology of Sexual Harassment

      1
      Teaching of Psychology
      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Sexual harassment (SH) occurs when people are targets of unwanted sexual comments, sexual gestures, or sexual actions because of their actual or perceived gender, gender expression, or sexual orientation. Due to its frequency and harmful effects on people and organizations, and because it is often a symptom of social inequalities, SH is of concern to psychologists. Using psychological theory and research as well as intersectional and contextual lenses, this article describes how SH is varied in its forms, targets, and origins. I explore explanations for SH with a focus on sociocultural gender and power perspectives. I also employ a person-by-situation perspective to show how contextual factors interact with individual factors to influence incidence. Because reducing SH is important for safe and inclusive schools, organizations, and public settings, I identify possible solutions to this common social problem. Finally, I discuss how and why teaching about the psychology of SH can promote positive individual, group, organizational, and social change. In sum, I illustrate interesting and important psychological concepts and methods and show how psychology can be used to understand and treat social problems and inequalities.

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          Most cited references71

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          Identity and emergency intervention: how social group membership and inclusiveness of group boundaries shape helping behavior.

          Two experiments exploring the effects of social category membership on real-life helping behavior are reported. In Study 1, intergroup rivalries between soccer fans are used to examine the role of identity in emergency helping. An injured stranger wearing an in-group team shirt is more likely to be helped than when wearing a rival team shirt or an unbranded sports shirt. In Study 2, a more inclusive social categorization is made salient for potential helpers. Helping is extended to those who were previously identified as out-group members but not to those who do not display signs of group membership. Taken together, the studies show the importance of both shared identity between bystander and victim and the inclusiveness of salient identity for increasing the likelihood of emergency intervention.
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            Outcomes of exposure to workplace bullying: A meta-analytic review

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              Measuring Sexual Harassment: Theoretical and Psychometric Advances

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Teaching of Psychology
                Teaching of Psychology
                SAGE Publications
                0098-6283
                1532-8023
                January 2019
                December 16 2018
                January 2019
                : 46
                : 1
                : 96-103
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychology and Child Development, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA, USA
                Article
                10.1177/0098628318816183
                fc511f11-57f8-4316-81bd-6ddc64fce0e2
                © 2019

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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