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      Cystatin C as a Predictor for Outcomes in Patients with Negligible Renal Function

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          Abstract

          Background: High serum cystatin C (CysC) has been associated with clinical risks independently of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This study aims to investigate the predictive power of CysC in patients with a negligible GFR. Methods: Patients on chronic hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled for measurement of CysC levels and were followed up for one year. A daily urine amount <100 ml was considered negligible residual renal function (RRF). Results: CysC results were available in 183 dialysis patients. Of these, 131 patients had a negligible RRF. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model showed that CysC was an independent predictor of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular and infection events in all dialysis patients and in dialysis patients with a negligible RRF. Conclusion: CysC maintained its predictive power for adverse outcomes in patients with no meaningful GFR, indicating that the prognostic value of CysC is independent of the GFR. i 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

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          Most cited references 21

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          Serum cystatin C is superior to serum creatinine as a marker of kidney function: a meta-analysis.

          Serum cystatin C (Cys C) has been proposed as a simple, accurate, and rapid endogenous marker of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in research and clinical practice. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the superiority of Cys C over serum creatinine (Cr), with a few studies suggesting no significant difference. We performed a meta-analysis of available data from various studies to compare the accuracy of Cys C and Cr in relation to a reference standard of GFR. A bibliographic search showed 46 articles until December 31, 2001. We also retrieved data from eight other studies presented and published in abstract form. The overall correlation coefficient for the reciprocal of serum Cys C (r = 0.816; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.804 to 0.826) was superior to that of the reciprocal of serum Cr (r = 0.742; 95% CI, 0.726 to 0.758; P < 0.001). Similarly, receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-plot area under the curve (AUC) values for 1/Cys C had greater identity with the reference test for GFR (mean ROC-plot AUC for Cys C, 0.926; 95% CI, 0.892 to 0.960) than ROC-plot AUC values for 1/Cr (mean ROC-plot AUC for serum Cr, 0.837; 95% CI, 0.796 to 0.878; P < 0.001). Immunonephelometric methods of Cys C assay produced significantly greater correlations than other assay methods (r = 0.846 versus r = 0.784; P < 0.001). In this meta-analysis using currently available data, serum Cys C is clearly superior to serum Cr as a marker of GFR measured by correlation or mean ROC-plot AUC. Copyright 2002 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.
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            Estimating GFR using serum cystatin C alone and in combination with serum creatinine: a pooled analysis of 3,418 individuals with CKD.

            Serum cystatin C was proposed as a potential replacement for serum creatinine in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation. We report the development and evaluation of GFR-estimating equations using serum cystatin C alone and serum cystatin C, serum creatinine, or both with demographic variables. Test of diagnostic accuracy. Participants screened for 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD) studies in the United States (n = 2,980) and a clinical population in Paris, France (n = 438). Measured GFR (mGFR). Estimated GFR using the 4 new equations based on serum cystatin C alone, serum cystatin C, serum creatinine, or both with age, sex, and race. New equations were developed by using linear regression with log GFR as the outcome in two thirds of data from US studies. Internal validation was performed in the remaining one third of data from US CKD studies; external validation was performed in the Paris study. GFR was measured by using urinary clearance of iodine-125-iothalamate in the US studies and chromium-51-EDTA in the Paris study. Serum cystatin C was measured by using Dade-Behring assay, standardized serum creatinine values were used. Mean mGFR, serum creatinine, and serum cystatin C values were 48 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (5th to 95th percentile, 15 to 95), 2.1 mg/dL, and 1.8 mg/L, respectively. For the new equations, coefficients for age, sex, and race were significant in the equation with serum cystatin C, but 2- to 4-fold smaller than in the equation with serum creatinine. Measures of performance in new equations were consistent across the development and internal and external validation data sets. Percentages of estimated GFR within 30% of mGFR for equations based on serum cystatin C alone, serum cystatin C, serum creatinine, or both levels with age, sex, and race were 81%, 83%, 85%, and 89%, respectively. The equation using serum cystatin C level alone yields estimates with small biases in age, sex, and race subgroups, which are improved in equations including these variables. Study population composed mainly of patients with CKD. Serum cystatin C level alone provides GFR estimates that are nearly as accurate as serum creatinine level adjusted for age, sex, and race, thus providing an alternative GFR estimate that is not linked to muscle mass. An equation including serum cystatin C level in combination with serum creatinine level, age, sex, and race provides the most accurate estimates.
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              Cystatin C deficiency in human atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms.

              The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm involves breakdown of the elastic laminae. Elastolytic cysteine proteases, including cathepsins S and K, are overexpressed at sites of arterial elastin damage, but whether endogenous local inhibitors counterbalance these proteases is unknown. We show here that, whereas cystatin C is normally expressed in vascular wall smooth muscle cells (SMCs), this cysteine protease inhibitor is severely reduced in both atherosclerotic and aneurysmal aortic lesions. Furthermore, increased abdominal aortic diameter among 122 patients screened by ultrasonography correlated inversely with serum cystatin C levels. In vitro, cytokine-stimulated vascular SMCs secrete cathepsins, whose elastolytic activity could be blocked when cystatin C secretion was induced by treatment with TGF-beta(1). The findings highlight a potentially important role for imbalance between cysteine proteases and cystatin C in arterial wall remodeling and establish that cystatin C deficiency occurs in vascular disease.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BPU
                Blood Purif
                10.1159/issn.0253-5068
                Blood Purification
                S. Karger AG
                0253-5068
                1421-9735
                2014
                December 2014
                17 October 2014
                : 38
                : 2
                : 81-88
                Affiliations
                aDivision of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, E-DA Hospital, Kaohsiung, bDivision of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, cInstitute of Clinical Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, dDivision of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, and eSchool of Medicine for International Studies, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
                Author notes
                *Shih-Yuan Hung, MD, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, E-DA Hospital, No.1, Yida Road, Jiaosu Village, Yanchao District, Kaohsiung City 82445 (Taiwan), E-Mail ed100367@edah.org.tw, hsy200310@yahoo.com.tw, hoim7024@ms3.hinet.net
                Article
                365837 Blood Purif 2014;38:81-88
                10.1159/000365837
                25342167
                © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, Tables: 4, Pages: 8
                Categories
                Original Paper

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