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      The Insect database in Dokdo, Korea: An updated version in 2020

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          Abstract

          Background

          Dokdo, a group of islands near the East Coast of South Korea, comprises 89 small islands. These volcanic islands were created by an eruption that also led to the formation of the Ulleungdo Islands (located in the East Sea), which are approximately 87.525 km away from Dokdo. Dokdo is important for geopolitical reasons; however, because of certain barriers to investigation, such as weather and time constraints, knowledge of its insect fauna is limited compared to that of Ulleungdo. Until 2017, insect fauna on Dokdo included 10 orders, 74 families, 165 species and 23 undetermined species; subsequently, from 2018 to 2019, we discovered 23 previously unrecorded species and three undetermined species via an insect survey.

          New information

          As per our recent study, the database of insect species on Dokdo has been expanded to 10 orders, 81 families, 188 species and 23 undetermined species. This database has been registered in the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF; www.GBIF.org) and is the first record for insect fauna on Dokdo.

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          Most cited references 47

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          Biodiversity dynamics in isolated island communities: interaction between natural and human-mediated processes.

          The flora and fauna of oceanic islands have inspired research since the early scientific explorations. Islands can be considered 'nature's test tubes'- simple systems with multiple replicates. Our research has used the simplicity of island systems to understand ecological community dynamics and to compare the properties of island communities with those in more complex mainland systems. Here, we present three topics: (i) current patterns of biodiversity on isolated islands of the Pacific; (ii) current patterns of disturbance and invasion on islands; and (iii) future trajectories inferred from these patterns. We examine features of islands (in particular, topography and isolation) that have allowed for given levels and distribution of endemicity. The extent to which island communities are impacted by, resist or accommodate disturbance and/or invasions by nonindigenous species appears to be dictated to a large extent by properties of the native communities and how these communities were originally assembled. Accordingly, patterns of disturbance and invasion are very different for high (montane) islands that are extremely isolated compared to those that are nearer to a source of natural migrants. As with all biotas, those on islands are dynamic entities. However, the unique aspect of islands is their isolation, and extreme isolation has largely been lost over the course of the last few centuries due to the development of transportation routes. We argue that such a modified dynamic will affect the future of the biota and the processes that gave rise to the biota. Specifically for isolated habitats, ecological processes will become increasingly more likely to generate biodiversity than evolutionary processes which have been relatively more important in the past. In the short term, island biotas and other similar biotas that occur in montane habitats may fare well as species are often abundant locally in the habitat to which they are indigenous, and may demonstrate considerable resistance and resilience to invasion. However, island biotas - and other biotas that show high local endemism - will likely not fare well in the face of prolonged disturbance. The biotas in these areas generally display a relatively low dispersal capacity; therefore, under conditions of long-term habitat modification, isolated biotas are likely to be swamped by non-natives, which - simply because of random processes and higher propagule pressure - will move more readily into available habitats. Thus, despite the importance of incorporating the evolutionary process into conservation efforts, we must also be careful to evaluate the likely form that the processes will take when the context (specifically, extent of isolation) has been highly modified.
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            Threats from Alien Plant Species in the Galapagos Islands

             A. Mauchamp (1997)
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              Genetics, Evolution, and Conservation of Island Plants

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodivers Data J
                1
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F9B2E808-C883-5F47-B276-6D62129E4FF4
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:245B00E9-BFE5-4B4F-B76E-15C30BA74C02
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2836
                1314-2828
                2021
                26 January 2021
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ] School of Life Science, BK21 FOUR KNU Creative BioResearch Group, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea School of Life Science, BK21 FOUR KNU Creative BioResearch Group, Kyungpook National University Daegu South Korea
                [2 ] Research Institute for Dok-do and Ulleung-do Island, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea Research Institute for Dok-do and Ulleung-do Island, Kyungpook National University Daegu South Korea
                [3 ] School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea School of Applied Biosciences, Kyungpook National University Daegu South Korea
                [4 ] Research Institute for Phylogenomics and Evolution, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South Korea Research Institute for Phylogenomics and Evolution, Kyungpook National University Daegu South Korea
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Kwang Shik Choi ( ksc@ 123456knu.ac.kr ).

                Academic editor: Paulo Borges

                Article
                62011 13504
                10.3897/BDJ.9.e62011
                7854556
                Jihun Ryu, Young-Kun Kim, Sang Jae Suh, Kwang Shik Choi

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 1, References: 53
                Categories
                Data Paper (Biosciences)
                Toxicology
                Catalogues and Checklists

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